FBHVC UPDATES

 

FBHVC UPDATES March 2014

VED exemption for historic vehicles

At Budget 2013 the Government announced that it will extend the cut-off date from which classic vehicles are exempt from VED by one year. From 1 April 2014 a vehicle manufactured before 1 January 1974 will be exempt from paying VED. Because this is a tax rates and bands related matter no draft legislation was issued for public consultation as part of the publication of the draft Finance Bill 2014 on 10 December 2013. The Government will publish the legislation when the final Finance Bill 2014 is laid in Parliament shortly after the Budget 2014.

FUEL NEWS

Matthew Vincent

Ethanol in petrol

Queries have arisen in the last few months about high octane unleaded petrol (Super Premium) sold in the UK, and whether or not this blend should contain ethanol, as it is supposed to be the so-called ‘Protection Grade’. There may be some uncertainty about this issue, so a few words of explanation might be useful. Protection Grade will be limited to 5% ethanol when petrol of 10% ethanol content is introduced into the market. This has not apparently happened yet, although the legal framework is in place, and it can be legally sold but must be labelled appropriately. The higher octane Super Premium fuels are blended to achieve the high octane quality without addition of ethanol. However, they leave the refinery in that condition and move on to distribution centres where ethanol may or may not be added. This highlights the problem of predicting which Super Premium blends will contain ethanol and which will not. There was a time when Shell V-Power petrol was definitely ethanol free, but this changed some years ago now, and it is known that ethanol has been blended into Super Premium blends (Shell and Esso, and possibly BP) in some locations. Provided the ethanol content does not rise above 5%, where a label would be required, there is no breach of law or government intention in respect of Protection Grade. When petrol containing ethanol at 10% volume does reach the market, it must by law carry the label ‘E10’ and a warning that it might not be suitable for all cars, and the advice to consult the manufacturer. We recognise that the

latter advice might be a bit tricky for the owners of some historic vehicles.

Supermarket petrol

A recent invitation to receive Tesco Club Card points when purchasing fuel from an Esso petrol station led to a conversation which revealed that Tesco sell Esso petrol and diesel, hence the Club Card arrangement. As one of the Big Three fuel retailers in the UK, Esso have always been keen to protect their quality image, so the sale of Esso fuel by Tesco is an interesting development which might go some way to refute the popularly held myth that supermarket petrol is of lower quality than that sold by the oil majors.

New petroleum regulations

A document issued for consultation by the Health and Safety Executive this month covers the revision of the rules governing the handling and sale of petrol. The new legislation is mainly concerned with garage forecourts and the like, but it does also cover proposed new rules for the domestic storage of petrol for use in lawn mowers, boats etc., so it is also of interest for the historic vehicle owner. There does not seem too much to be concerned about, as the domestic storage proposal is for individuals to be permitted to store up to 10 litres in plastic containers, or up to 20 litres in metal containers, all such storage containers to be suitably marked. For those who are interested or who would like the opportunity to comment, the consultation document can be found on the following link: http://www.hse.gov.uk/consult/condocs/cd264.htm. The consultation period runs until 7 February 2014.

DVLA

Nigel Harrison

Demise of Proof of Insurance Requirement

From 16 December, there is no longer a requirement to provide proof of insurance when renewing VED, or when a vehicle is being taxed for the first time. However, although the insurance certificate is not required to be produced, in the case of an age-related application the owner will still need to inform the insurance company of the allocated registration number, and get an amended Certificate of Insurance.

Quoting the Roads Minister: "We want to make it as easy as possible for motorists to access government services. Getting rid of needless bits of paper, making changes to free up motorists time, whilst saving money for the taxpayer is all part of our commitment to get rid of unnecessary red tape". However, there is still a requirement for a vehicle to be insured if it is taxed. This is picked up under the Continuous Insurance Enforcement (CIE). Under that system, a comparison is made between vehicles that are taxed, and vehicles that are insured. If a vehicle is taxed but not insured, or there is a failed match between the taxed vehicle database, and the insured vehicle database, there will soon be a letter in the post, which needs to be reacted to.

MoT and Exemption Declaration

When a vehicle is taxed, if it is subject to an MoT, then an original MoT certificate is still required. If it is a pre-1960 vehicle, it will be exempt from an MoT. However, DVLA have indicated that if it is exempt and being taxed for the first time, or a tax renewal is being done, (except for online) then there is still a requirement for an MoT exemption form, V112 or V112G to be completed.

Automatic SORN Renewals

Any SORN (Statutory Off Road Notification) which expired after 16 December will be renewed automatically. Previously the default after a SORN had expired was that a vehicle needed to be taxed unless SORN was declared. With the new continuous SORN system, there is still a requirement to notify DVLA of any changes in vehicle or keeper details, including an address change. The consequences of not notifying DVLA of an address change of any vehicle can be quite significant.

There are some desirable vehicles where the registration number and chassis number is in the public domain. If someone wishes to clone that vehicle all they have to do, if they want a V5C, is to fill in a V62 form, indicating the registration number, and chassis number. DVLA then write to the last registered keeper, and if DVLA don’t get a reply within two weeks of posting, a new V5C is issued to the owner of the cloned vehicle. If it is years later when DVLA is notified of the correct address of the original competition vehicle then it can be quite difficult to unravel things, particularly if the cloned vehicle has been sold on. The cloned vehicle owner suddenly finds out his vehicle is not what he thought it

was, and possibly worth a much smaller sum. It would lose all rights to display the replicated registration number, and depending on circumstances could be allocated an age-related number or even a Q plate. It is likely that both vehicles will have to subject to a close inspection by DVLA/the police. There will be a delay in the issuing of a V5C to the genuine vehicle owner. Much of this would have been prevented if the genuine vehicle owner had notified DVLA of his new address, when the change occurred.

Administration of club supported applications

With the demise of the DVLA Local Offices, and the demise of the requirement to produce a certificate of insurance, the opportunity has been taken to update various bits of information on the Federation website.

The following has been updated:

 List of DVLA useful documents.

 Template dating letter. This has been split into two, to reflect NOVA, and non-NOVA.

 Template vehicle inspection sheet, and Guidelines for Inspectors.

 Admin sheet for inspections. This is completely new.

 DVLA Questions & Answers.

With the sample template documents, it is anticipated that clubs will have their own versions of these documents, but there might be benefit in a club glancing at the Federation versions.

Clubs administer vehicle inspections in different ways. Some clubs charge a flat rate for promoting an application, including the inspector’s travelling expenses. Other clubs have a standard rate for the admin for the application, with the inspector’s reasonable travelling expenses being a matter between the inspector and the owner. Many clubs will have one administration charge for members and another, typically higher, charge for non-members.

On the application admin front for many clubs the admin charges will go through the club books, so owners cheques will be payable to the club, and the V765 scheme signatory uses a club expenses form, to claim back their expenses. Other clubs may not have those systems in place, and owners are asked to make cheques are payable to the named club

signatory, and not to the club. Club signatories operating that system could be accused of making personal gain from a club activity, which could be subject to income tax, and may, or may not be approved of by the clubs other officials and auditors. It is totally up to a club how it manages its own internal affairs.

Document Vetting Service

When the DVLA Local Offices were around, as well as processing age-related applications, providing forms and information leaflets, and making photocopies of original documents relating to claims for original registration numbers, they also carried out a valuable service of making sure that all the documents were present for a successful application.

I am sure that all club V765 scheme signatories and vehicle owners will want every application for an original registration number, or application for an age-related number to be successful first time, without DVLA Swansea bouncing the application back to the owner just because a particular document is missing.

1. The Overseas registration document, OR dating letter from the manufacturer, OR club dating letter, as appropriate.

For an age- related application, these documents are listed at the bottom of the Federation’s template dating letter, which can be downloaded from the Federation website. For completeness these documents are listed below:

2. Completed V55/5 form.

3. Photographs of complete vehicle.

4. Photograph of chassis plate.

5. Photograph of engine number.

6. MoT issued under chassis number*, or if pre 1960 a V112/V112G MOT exemption form.

7. The £55 fee.

8. A photocopy proof of personal ID. Typically either a DVLA Photocard driving licence and paper counterpart, or, a DVLA driving licence, or a gas, electricity, water, or landline phone bill issued in the last three months.

9. If vehicle is subject to NOVA, a photocopy of the HMRC NOVA acknowledgement letter.

The application is posted by the owner to DVLA Swansea SA99 1BE.

*Once the vehicle is allocated a registration mark, DVLA will typically produce a new MoT certificate amended to include the new registration mark.

Note: Although the insurance certificate is not required to be produced with the registration application, the owner will need to inform the insurance company of the allocated registration number, and get an amended Certificate of Insurance.

For a claim for an original registration number a V765 form and pre-1984 evidence is required, plus items, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 9. The club will post these items to MASET, DVLA, Swansea SA99 1ZZ.

It is not necessary for the club producing the dating letter to see the owners ID or MoT certificate/V112/V112G, but it is going to be helpful to the owner to know that these documents are required by DVLA with the application. It will also be helpful to the owner if the club completes the V55/5 form, except for the Date of Birth pigeonhole, and the signing and dating, and at the same time mentioning about the hidden carbon paper. Also for a pre-1960 vehicle, it will help the owner if the club fills in the V112 or V112G form, except for the signing and dating.

INSURANCE NEWS

Aston Scott Ltd

Ensuring your event runs smoothly

For most vehicle clubs, the annual event or rally is a centrepiece of the year. It’s your opportunity to meet the members and to demonstrate the value they receive in return for their membership. That’s why it’s so important you ensure the event runs smoothly. The old adage that ‘proper planning prevents poor performance’ holds particularly true when it comes to events, so here are a few guidelines for you to consider when planning your event.

Step 1: Review last year’s event

This is probably not the first time you have run this type of event. Is there anything that has happened in previous years that you would prefer to avoid this year?

Step 2: Consider anything different that is happening this year?

Perhaps you have a new display or a different venue. What new risks may arise as a result of these changes?

Step 3: Produce a list of all the risks you have identified and who could be affected by these.

With our knowledge of the type of events undertaken by historic vehicle clubs, we have produced a list of risks that you may want to consider. This is by no means exhaustive but should help you to identify others that may be more specific to your particular event.

Specific risks could include:

 Weather: what risks might arise if you don’t get the perfect British summer day? Too muddy to park? Visitors not turning up and the event making a financial loss?

 Slip and trip hazards: cables and uneven ground are the classic risks. If you are also hosting any form of ‘boot’ sale, there is always a risk the participants are less than thorough with the way they set up their stands.

 Hazardous substances: the motor trade uses many substances over which legislation exerts some form of control. Are any of these being used in a way that is subject to control at the event?

 First aid: what need is there to provide first aid facilities? How will this be done? Does the event bring with it any specific injury risks that need particular consideration – for example driving events?

 Basic amenities: how will these (e.g. water, food, toilets) be provided and managed? Is there any risk to the continuation of these services during the event? What about waste management before, during and after the event? Is the catering provided externally? Have the suppliers been properly vetted?

 Vehicle movement: will any of the vehicles be moved whilst the public are at the event? Are any special controls necessary to keep vehicles and pedestrians apart? What about parking management?

 Crowd management: will there be any need to separate crowds from displays? Are there any high value displays you want to keep people distanced from - concours cars perhaps?

 Cash: will there be any large accumulations of cash? How will this be managed at and after the event?

 

 Contractors: are you contracting out any element of the event management? If so, have you checked the contractors own processes, controls and insurance protection are appropriate?

Step 4: Establish what can or should be done to mitigate each of the risks.

For each risk, produce an action plan detailing how it will be managed. Remember that it is not a requirement to completely eliminate each and every risk. Rather, it is a controlled approach to identifying and managing risks and dealing with those in a way required by law or common sense.

And finally…

Your insurance policy is designed to protect you from unforeseen events. Like any contract, it will contain terms, limitations and exclusions. Once you have completed your risk assessment and identified the steps to be taken, make sure that you understand what insurance protection you have against the remaining risks and are comfortable with those risks that are not insured. Not every eventuality can be insured, but there are a number of specialist event related insurance products available that can cover many of them. If you are uncertain, please speak with your insurance

 

EDITORIAL

Geoff Lancaster

 

Forgive me if I go a little off-piste for this edition’s editorial, but the help and support of your clubs and their members could tip the balance in an issue which does have relevance for all road users. Not so long ago I was taking part in a motorcycle race meeting at Brands Hatch. A friend and neighbour of mine was also competing. He unfortunately stalled his bike at the start and was struck from behind sustaining multiple injuries the worst of which was to his head. The intervention of the air ambulance undoubtedly saved his life and although he had a long period of recovery before him he is now living a full and active life.

As you probably know there is a network of air ambulances covering the country but they are all run as charities. While they work closely with the other emergency services, they are not part of these publicly funded services. There is precedent for this. The RNLI which bravely guards our coastal waters and has brought rescue to countless stricken sailors is also operated as a charity.

 

Now here’s the rub. The RNLI gets full VAT relief for the fuel that its lifeboats use….air ambulances do not! As you can imagine a twin-engined gas turbine helicopter consumes prodigious amounts of kerosene. Doesn’t seem fair does it?

 

If you agree then you and your members can help. One of the more enlightened improvements to our parliamentary democracy of recent times is the ‘E Gov petition’. Anyone can start one of these on-line on any subject. If you get 100,000 signatures your issue is automatically debated in parliament.

 

So if you think the air ambulances should be VAT exempt go to: http://epetitions.direct.go.uk/petitions/29349

Do it and exercise your democratic right. Thank you. And while you are there you can also vote to save Mallory Park race circuit which is threatened by noise objectors in the locality.

 

 

LEGISLATION David Hurley & Bob Owen

 

EU ROADWORTHINESS REGULATION

The saga continues as the proposal wends its way through the EU system.

At the EU Parliament plenary session on 3 July 2013 a further amendment to the description of ‘historic vehicles’ was tabled by a British MEP which would have permitted changes provided they were purely for safety reasons. He had not discussed this with those MEPs having especial expertise in the subject and they did not support it as it was generally felt to be too prescriptive. In the event, it was not approved. Currently, given the approach not only of the EU organisations but also of most of the FIVA representatives, it does appear that any final definition will have some sort of prohibition on at least ‘significant’ changes to permit exemption from the test regime as a historic vehicle.

It would appear that the Commission are ignoring the views of the majority of the Transport Council (which is the body made up of national Transport Ministers) that this legislation should be a Directive. The Transport Council will be discussing progress again and hopefully their stance will prevail. We will be reiterating our views to Stephen Hammond MP, the Transport Minister, but also briefing the Scottish Transport Minister, Keith Brown MSP, who also attends the Transport Council, and for the sake of completeness the Northern Ireland Transport Minister, Alex Attwood MLA, as well.

 

Stop Press

As this issue was going to press we learned that the definition of an historic vehicle has been amended from:

‘vehicle of historic interest’ means any vehicle which fulfils all the following conditions:

·           It was manufactured at least 30 years ago,

·           It is maintained by use of replacement parts which reproduce the historic components of the vehicle;

·           it has not sustained any change in the technical characteristics of its main components such as engine, brakes, steering or suspension and

·           It has not been changed in its appearance

to vehicle of historic interest’ means any vehicle which is considered to be historic by the Member State of registration or one of its appointed authorising bodies  and which fulfils all the following conditions:

·        It was manufactured or registered for the first time at least 30 years ago;

·        Its specific type, as defined by the relevant legal acts of the Union on type approval, is no longer in production;

·        It is preserved and maintained in a historically correct condition, and therefore has not undergone major changes in its technical characteristics

 

THREE WHEELERS AND DRIVING LICENCES

The third Driving Licence Directive (2006/126/EC) classified all three-wheelers (for new drivers) as motor cycles. The FBHVC together with interested clubs have consistently pointed out that many three-wheelers are more akin to cars. We were aware (unofficially) that the Department for Transport were concerned about this change but little progress in sorting out the problem for new drivers was evident. Recently the Federation raised (robustly!) the topic again, alongside the Morgan Three Wheeler Club.

The DfT response is more encouraging and is quoted below unedited.

 

‘The concerns that the Morgan Three Wheeler Club has raised about how the third Directive (2006/126/EC) will affect those wishing to drive three-wheeled vehicles are well known to us. To address those concerns we have been working with the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) on a solution. DSA plans a public consultation this summer in which we plan to include this issue, with the possibility of Regulatory amendment later this year. As you will be aware, a clearance process needs to be completed before a consultation is issued and so I cannot offer more definite information at this stage.’

 

Watch this space!

 

REACH INVESTIGATING THE CHEMICALS USED IN CHROMIUM PLATING

REACH is a European Regulation ((No 1907/2006) concerning chemicals and their safe use. It aims to improve the protection of human health and the environment through a system of Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals.

 

The EU body set up to perform the necessary functions is quite large and regularly communicates with the appropriate ministries in member states. In the UK this is Defra.

Normally hazardous chemicals are only banned if a less noxious one can be satisfactorily substituted. However REACH can instigate detailed regulations on the handling and use of chemicals in the workplace to avoid damage to the wellbeing of staff. Obvious examples are contractors removing asbestos from buildings and the special overalls (with air supply) worn by people spray painting in booths.

 

We have been reminded that certain chromium substances are being considered for inclusion in REACH. This is of considerable concern to us.

Chromium plating is widely used in its various forms for current manufacturing processes, plus of course to refurbish our historic vehicles. We would not wish it to be either banned completely nor to become too expensive for the traders who currently do chromium plating to allow them to remain in that business.

 

We have made contact with the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) and established that the world automotive business is actively engaged in discussions with EU authorities to manage this question, whether by the development of alternative processes and products or the management of manufacturing processes for chromium. We await a brief from them as to what has been being done and what they have achieved so far.

 

When we have that brief we will assess how we go forward, whether in tandem with SMMT, in engaging with Defra and perhaps through FIVA directly with the EU authorities.

Our initial approach to DEFRA has not as yet elicited any response. We will keep you advised as this new topic progresses.

 

INTRODUCTION OF NOVA

The Federation has been receiving a number of queries regarding the introduction of the online process NOVA (Notification of Vehicle Arrivals), introduced by Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs to counter examples of fraud. The intent is for HMRC to have real time knowledge of all importation of vehicles into the UK.

 

Under NOVA, DVLA may only register imported vehicles if they have confirmation from HMRC that HMRC are satisfied that the proper level of duty and VAT (if any) has been paid.

 

The HMRC VAT Information Sheet 06/13 (revised) June 2013 on the subject can be found at http://customs.hmrc.gov.uk/channelsPortalWebApp/channelsPortalWebApp.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=pageLibrary_PublicNoticesAndInfoSheets&propertyType=document&columns=1&id=HMCE_PROD1_032698.

Members who may possess or be contemplating acquisition of imported vehicles should note the following points:

 

·      The duty to notify under NOVA applies to importation of land vehicles, whether new or old and whether or not duty or VAT is payable.

·      Private individuals and non-VAT registered businesses importing land vehicles from outside the EU do not have to use NOVA, as evidence is available from the importation forms

·      Notification under NOVA in respect of any importation after 15 April must be within 14 days of importation. There are penalties for failure to do so.

·      NOVA replaces the following Forms: C&E 386, C&E 388, C&E 389, VAT Form 414 and VAT Form 415.

·      For vehicles imported before 15 April 2013 but not registered by that date there are transition arrangements.

·      These arrangements are that HMRC will examine and date the superseded paper forms.

 

Currently there is no recognition by HMRC that the relevant paper forms may not be available to the applicant.

 

As there has to date been no obligation on importers to pass on such forms to purchasers of vehicles, nor a specific reason to keep the form or forms safe, the relevant form (usually VAT orm 414) may thus not have been retained even when properly completed. There may thus be various quite proper, or at the least fully explicable, reasons why they are not available.

 

This is of course more likely in the case of restoration project vehicles, where importation may have occurred many years ago, and the project may have passed through several hands but has only now progressed to the point of application for registration.

 

We will be requesting clarification from HMRC as to how they would deal with such circumstances, and what if any alternative evidence of the importation status of the vehicle might be acceptable to HMRC in such cases.

Meanwhile we would advise members as follows:

·          If importing a vehicle into the UK, comply fully with NOVA.

·          If you realise you have failed to comply, even if no immediate application to DVLA to register is anticipated, contact HMRC to rectify the position without any delay. (At the time of writing the attitude of HMRC to voluntary rectification action, especially where no VAT was payable, is unknown)

·          When acquiring a vehicle within the UK which was imported by a third party after 15 April 2013 and is not yet registered, do not buy without being provided with evidence of compliance with NOVA (or alternative evidence if importation was private and from outside the EU). It will be required on application to DVLA for registration.

 

·          When acquiring a vehicle in the UK which was imported by a third party prior to 15 April and is not yet registered,

o          do not buy without the import forms relating to the importation, as they will be needed on application to DVLA for registration. Ideally the forms should have been submitted to HMRC and dated by them. If not, you will need to send them for dating to HMRC.

o          If the import forms are not available but you still wish to buy, ensure you have as much documentary and other evidence as possible of the date and place of importation. (At the time of writing it is not possible to guarantee what if any evidence will satisfy HMRC.)

·          If you possess a vehicle imported before 15 April 2013 but not yet registered, and you have the import forms relating to the vehicle, they will be required on application to DVLA for registration. It will be best to submit them immediately to HMRC for dating even if immediate application to DVLA for registration is not anticipated

·          Where you have already acquired in the UK a vehicle which has been imported prior to 15 April 2013 by a third party, in respect of which you have no import forms,

o         request the person from whom the vehicle was acquired to send you the relevant import forms, where they exist, without delay, and if they are obtained submit them to HMRC for dating even if immediate application to DVLA for registration is not anticipated

o         where the forms cannot be found, immediately seek all possible evidence of date and place of importation.

o         Do not wait until the date for application to DVLA for registration is approaching. Provide this evidence to HMRC. (At the time of writing it is not possible to guarantee what if any evidence will satisfy HMRC.)

 

FUEL NEWS

At the beginning of May the Federation wrote to Norman Baker MP, Parliamentary under Secretary of State for Transport, about the current requirement that petrol with an ethanol content of not more than 5% by volume (also called ‘protection grade’) must remain available in the UK is scheduled to finish at the end of 2013.

 

The letter stated our concerns namely there are known adverse effects when fuel containing ethanol is used in the fuel systems of historic vehicles and many of our member clubs have expressed concerns over these adverse side effects. While even a 5% level of ethanol in petrol is not entirely harm-free, it is nevertheless preferable to twice the level, as would be present in the proposed E10 fuel.

 

We sought an assurance that the provision of protection grade petrol, currently the super-grade petrol, containing not more than 5% ethanol, will be guaranteed in the UK beyond the end of 2013.

 

Mr. Baker replied thus: ‘The industry fuel standard for petrol (EN228) has been revised and a new version has recently been published by the British Standard Institute, which allows up to 10% ethanol content. This means that fuel suppliers are free to supply petrol containing anything from 0-10% ethanol. Ultimately any decision to supply E10 should not be introduced while there remain a significant number of vehicles which may not be compatible with this new standard. I have met with and written to fuel suppliers to encourage them to delay supplying E10 until the UK market is ready.

 

With regards to the current legal requirement to supply the protection grade – petrol with maximum 5% ethanol content (E5) – we are considering whether this obligation should be extended beyond this year. I am minded to extend the requirement, but my officials will let you, and other stakeholders, know when a final decision has been taken.

 

Our current expectation is that E5 will – in any event – remain widely available for the foreseeable future, regardless of a legal requirement. It is also worth noting that prior to 1988 there were no limits on maximum ethanol content and petrol containing up to 25% ethanol was marketed in the Uk from the late 1920s to the 1960s.

 

I would also like to clarify that UK legislation does not prohibit the supply of petrol with no ethanol content. The Motor Fuel (Composition and Content) Regulations 1999 set a maximum permissible ethanol content of petrol – there is no minimum content. It is therefore a commercial decision for suppliers whether to supply petrol with no ethanol content.’

 

 

 

UK LEGISLATION

David Hurley

 

LAW COMMISSION REVIEW OF PRIVATE HIRE VEHICLES

Unusually, the Law Commission decided in April this year to issue an interim report on their 2012 consultation on Private Hire Vehicles - on receipt we immediately placed an appropriate news item on our website, reproduced below.

 

In July 2011 the Law Commission was tasked to review the complex legislative basis that regulates the operation of Taxis and Private Hire Vehicles, their drivers and operators (confined to England and Wales). It is not normal practice for the Law Commission to publish any indication of its preferred policy midway through the process but there were more than 3000 responses, many showing understandable concern at the outline proposals issued when the consultation was launched in May 2012. This is why the Commission decided to depart from normal procedure and publish their thinking at this interim stage. They stressed that the interim statement is not the final report. They have yet to analyse in depth all the responses received and will continue to develop policies alongside Parliamentary counsel etc. They make it clear that the final report may differ in approach. This will then be submitted to Government and have to progress through parliamentary scrutiny.

 

Paragraph 9 of the statement is quoted here without amendment:

‘We recommend that wedding and funeral cars should continue to be exempted from licensing. Our provisional recommendation in respect of the wedding and funeral car exemption raised unparalleled concern among members of these trades although licensing authorities and the police agreed that that the current exemption could cause problems. On balance, we have concluded that there are valid arguments to keep the exclusion from licensing in primary legislation.’

 

The FBHVC deliberately limited its consultation response to the proposal that wedding and funeral cars (specifically excluded from existing control) should cease to be exempt in the future and be classed alongside PHVs. We are fully aware that a significant minority of historic vehicle owners occasionally hire their cherished possession for weddings (plus a much smaller funeral sector) mainly to defray escalating running and restoration costs. There are also a number of small commercial concerns which have blossomed over the last thirty years now that the public’s genuine interest has grown and they appreciated the UK’s road transport heritage.

 

The Government also responded to the consultation and paragraph 15 of their submission is also shown unaltered:

‘We do not consider that there is a case for requiring the licensing of wedding and funeral services though there may be a case for bringing certain categories into the licensing regime and then immediately exempting them, in the way, for example, that food is within the VAT regime but zero rated.’

 

The Federation will continue to monitor this topic to ensure the existing rights of historic vehicle owners, but it would appear at this stage that our efforts, along with others, have been successful.

 

EU DRAFT ON ROADWORTHINESS TESTING

Following the last EU Transport Committee MEPs meeting, 324 amendments were tabled (147 pages of text) for their next meeting, due at the end of May. Many of these support the thrust of the views held by the other European federations within FIVA. All EU FIVA members then wrote to their own country’s MEPs who sit on the Transport Committee repeating their arguments and making appropriate comments on which amendments should be agreed and more importantly those which were seen to be unhelpful.

As stated in our previous newsletters, this topic will run on for many months but we will keep members informed of developments.

 

NORTHERN IRELAND MOT EXEMPTION

Environment Minister, Alex Attwood, issued a statement on 29 April regarding exemption from annual MoT tests for pre-1960 vehicles following the introduction of the exemption in the rest of the UK in November last year. The proposed date of implementation in Northern Ireland is September 2013.

 

BUT the Northern Ireland proposal excludes vehicles ‘which have not undergone substantial change’ The Ministry have picked up the overly prescriptive definition contained in the original draft EU Roadworthiness Regulation, which has already been amended by the EU Council of Ministers and as can be seen above has still to make more progress before becoming a Directive with universally agreed wording. The full statement can be found on http://www.northernireland.gov.uk/news-doe-290413-historic-vehicles-exempt.

 

The FBHVC have written to the Minister, as we feel that whilst the EU Roadworthiness saga continues to develop, the incorporation of a draft definition is premature and is out of line with the majority of vehicles currently exempted in the rest of the UK. We have also pointed out the practical problems of making testers a judge (and jury) of historical alterations, many of which are undocumented.

 

NEW HANDBOOK FROM LARA

Traffic Management Hierarchy: Good Practice in Traffic Management on Unsealed Public Roads.

Recreational motoring on unsealed roads and byways is an emotive and complex issue. Some people think that motor vehicles should simply be banned from unsealed roads and nothing is easily going to change that view, but there is increasingly a ‘middle ground’ approach from highway authorities, which seeks to apply a considered ‘least restrictive approach’ philosophy to traffic management on our minor highways.

Over the last few years two new factors have come to bear upon this issue: the financial cuts suffered by councils, and the increasing frequency of extreme weather events, leading to waterlogged ground conditions far more often than a decade ago. This guidance is intended to be helpful to all concerned, and to avoid resort to the courts at great expense to all parties in terms of manpower and money. LARA believes that consensus management of motor traffic on unsealed roads, appropriate to the circumstances in each case, together with sufficient maintenance and a realistic expectation of what a byway should be like, is the way ahead. This is the first version of LARA’s Traffic Management Hierarchy, and they invite and welcome suggestions for improvement. LARA and its members are ready and willing to work with highway authorities, and hope that this positive attitude will be reciprocated.

Download Part 1 and Part 2 at www.laragb.org

 

ANY OTHER BUSINESS

The EU Roadworthiness proposals have understandably taken up a great deal of the legislation committee’s time but they have still been able to keep an eye on other legislation, some of which could certainly affect our hobby.

 

Waste Prevention Programme for England, DEFRA call for evidence: Our comment was simply to remind the Department that End of Life Vehicle legislation does not apply to historic vehicles. In line with waste prevention actions outlined in the Call for Evidence document, owners of such vehicles seek to recycle spares and historic vehicle parts where possible. Inevitably there are surplus parts which need to be disposed of at local council facilities and our request was that this should continue to be possible outside ELV legislation.

 

Red Tape Challenge: The next road transport phase is due to take place from 20 May to 17 June.

 

Street Trading and Pedlary Law: There were initially concerns that this might affect autojumbles etc. but after consultation with the Autojumblers Association it was decided that no submission was necessary.

 

DVLA Vehicle Online Services and Transforming DVLA Services: these are both closed consultations and there has been no more news to report.

 

Historic Vehicles MoT Exemption Review: having spoken to a number of specialist insurers there do not seem to be concerns about the pre-1960 MoT exemption at present. Any members who do experience problems should contact the Federation secretary.

 

Third Driving Licence Directive: clubs who cater for three-wheeled vehicles are worried that they may not attract new, younger members as they would now have to pass a motorcycle test at age 24 to be able to drive a three-wheeled car. The legislation committee have agreed to undertake further research into previous consultations and also the Construction and Use Regulations.                                                                                                                                     

 

Fuel topics: there have been no developments regarding ethanol in petrol since the last newsletter.

 

EU LEGISLATION

Roadworthiness Testing – EU institutions examine the Commission proposal

The European Parliament is progressing with its examinations of the European Commission’s draft Regulation to replace the 1996 Roadworthiness Testing Directive: http://ec.europa.eu/transport/road_safety/pdf/road_worthiness_package/proposal_for_a_regulation_on_periodic_roadworthiness_tests_en.pdf

 

The Transport Committee has been preparing its Report which will be presented to Parliament in July. As noted in the previous EU issues update, FIVA has contacted all the key MEPs on the Committee. The rapporteur, German MEP Werner Kuhn, recently submitted his draft report and his amendments certainly improved the definition proposed by the European Commission and demonstrated that he is sensitive to the case made by FIVA. However, FIVA remains concerned that even with these amendments the resultant definition of a historic vehicle would be too prescriptive and so would therefore result in some historic vehicles being excluded from definition. Accordingly, FIVA has continued to urge MEPs to table amendments to ensure that the Recitals and Articles of the adopted law more closely reflect the FIVA definition of a historic vehicle. While we have indications that such amendments may be tabled – they will only be published nearer the time of the next Transport Committee discussion, scheduled for 22-23 April (too late for inclusion in this newsletter).

 

FIVA raised other concerns about the proposed Regulation which are important to historic vehicles. The original 1996 Directive provided the principle that testing of historic vehicles under member states law should be done on the basis of standards which are not stricter than those which vehicles were originally designed to meet. Amendments proposed by both the European Council and Mr Kuhn pose the risk that the Regulation will introduce stricter safety and environmental standards so it is important that reference be maintained of this original guiding principle in the new law. FIVA has also noted that an amendment tabled by Mr Kuhn would prevent a person who maintains or repairs a vehicle from also being the inspector of that vehicle. If this amendment were to be adopted it would have a significant and negative impact on many garages across the EU which currently provide both services - allowed in many member states but not in others. A number of MEPs also expressed this concern during a debate on the proposal on 20 March in the EP Transport Committee: much time was devoted to it, indicating that the amendment will be opposed by many members.

 

The Transport Committee will vote on 30 May. The European Parliament 1-4 July Plenary Session is scheduled to adopted the EP First Reading opinion after which the European Council will consider again the proposal alongside the EP amendments.

 

DVLA

Nigel Harrison

 

MANUFACTURERS LETTERS FOR RECONSTRUCTED CLASSICS

In the last Newsletter, I indicated that a DVLA local office staff member had rejected a dating letter, saying that the owner should obtain (or attempt to obtain) a dating letter from the original manufacturer. My assessment, based on DVLA leaflet INF26, with the wordy title of Guidelines on how you can register kitcars and rebuilt or radically altered vehicles, was that this was an incorrect decision by the DVLA. Based on the following recent correspondence, reproduced below with DVLA at Swansea, it appears that DVLA have moved the goal posts.

 

‘There appears to be some confusion between dating certificates and the reconstructed classic category.

I should explain that dating evidence is necessary to support a range of vehicles coming forward for first registration, such as original vehicles that have lost their registration number. It has always been the case that the evidence should be obtained from the manufacturer where possible as advised in the INF 106 and V848 leaflets.

The Reconstructed Classic category was introduced following the 1996 review of the rebuilt, radically altered and kit vehicle procedures (INF 26) and is intended for the registration of vehicles which may not be completely original but could contain or comprise of genuine period components. A dating certificate alone is not sufficient evidence to register these vehicles.

The appropriate club must authenticate that the vehicle represents the marque concerned and that it has been built from period components of the same specification, all over 25 years old.’

 

As background information, leaflet INF 106, is called ‘How to import your vehicle into Great Britain’, and V848 is called ‘How to register your “old” vehicle.’

 

I also paid a visit to my DVLA local office, who indicated that there has been a longstanding DVLA Swansea requirement that the owner needs to check first to see if the original manufacturer can produce a dating letter, but this is not something that the DVLA local office has insisted upon in the past. A dating letter from the appropriate club has (until recently) been sufficient to date the vehicle. However, there has been a recent instruction from DVLA Swansea, to the DVLA local offices, to insist that the original manufacturer is contacted for a dating letter. This requirement is said to be implied in DVLA leaflet V848: ‘You will need to provide proof of the year of manufacture. The chassis/frame number can often be used to establish this. If the manufacturer is no longer in existence, many vehicle enthusiast clubs can provide dating certificates to support a V55/5 application for an age-related number.’

 

There is a DVLA Swansea staff member tasked with the job of writing out to manufacturers to try and establish who has historic records. That particular task is a minefield, seeing that the holder of the current manufacturer trade mark could well be a completely different organisation to the organisation that holds the original manufacturers records. The current manufacturing base might be in India, but the only legacy records exist in microfilm form by a specialist club in the UK. The year range of historical records held by a particular manufacturer could well be a moving target, seeing that some manufacturers will dispose of old records on a routine basis. Also, records can suddenly disappear due to flooding or fire.

 

It has been suggested to DVLA that if a vehicle is more than 25 years old, that the requirement to contact the original manufacturer should be waived, seeing that a significant proportion of manufacturers do not support vehicles more than 25 years old. To date, DVLA have not responded to that proposal.

 

The enforced DVLA requirement that manufacturer records take precedence over a clubs dating letter, is a significant extra hurdle for owners, at a time when DVLA are indicating that they want to streamline their services. By the time this Newsletter is distributed, the Federation will have had a meeting with DVLA to discuss this issue, amongst others. I would anticipate that an update would be in the next Newsletter, and please keep an eye on the website for updates.

 

July 2013

UK LEGISLATION

David Hurley

 

LAW COMMISSION REVIEW OF PRIVATE HIRE VEHICLES

Unusually, the Law Commission decided in April this year to issue an interim report on their 2012 consultation on Private Hire Vehicles - on receipt we immediately placed an appropriate news item on our website, reproduced below.

 

In July 2011 the Law Commission was tasked to review the complex legislative basis that regulates the operation of Taxis and Private Hire Vehicles, their drivers and operators (confined to England and Wales). It is not normal practice for the Law Commission to publish any indication of its preferred policy midway through the process but there were more than 3000 responses, many showing understandable concern at the outline proposals issued when the consultation was launched in May 2012. This is why the Commission decided to depart from normal procedure and publish their thinking at this interim stage. They stressed that the interim statement is not the final report. They have yet to analyse in depth all the responses received and will continue to develop policies alongside Parliamentary counsel etc. They make it clear that the final report may differ in approach. This will then be submitted to Government and have to progress through parliamentary scrutiny.

 

Paragraph 9 of the statement is quoted here without amendment:

‘We recommend that wedding and funeral cars should continue to be exempted from licensing. Our provisional recommendation in respect of the wedding and funeral car exemption raised unparalleled concern among members of these trades although licensing authorities and the police agreed that that the current exemption could cause problems. On balance, we have concluded that there are valid arguments to keep the exclusion from licensing in primary legislation.’

 

The FBHVC deliberately limited its consultation response to the proposal that wedding and funeral cars (specifically excluded from existing control) should cease to be exempt in the future and be classed alongside PHVs. We are fully aware that a significant minority of historic vehicle owners occasionally hire their cherished possession for weddings (plus a much smaller funeral sector) mainly to defray escalating running and restoration costs. There are also a number of small commercial concerns which have blossomed over the last thirty years now that the public’s genuine interest has grown and they appreciated the UK’s road transport heritage.

 

The Government also responded to the consultation and paragraph 15 of their submission is also shown unaltered:

‘We do not consider that there is a case for requiring the licensing of wedding and funeral services though there may be a case for bringing certain categories into the licensing regime and then immediately exempting them, in the way, for example, that food is within the VAT regime but zero rated.’

 

The Federation will continue to monitor this topic to ensure the existing rights of historic vehicle owners, but it would appear at this stage that our efforts, along with others, have been successful.

 

EU DRAFT ON ROADWORTHINESS TESTING

Following the last EU Transport Committee MEPs meeting, 324 amendments were tabled (147 pages of text) for their next meeting, due at the end of May. Many of these support the thrust of the views held by the other European federations within FIVA. All EU FIVA members then wrote to their own country’s MEPs who sit on the Transport Committee repeating their arguments and making appropriate comments on which amendments should be agreed and more importantly those which were seen to be unhelpful.

As stated in our previous newsletters, this topic will run on for many months but we will keep members informed of developments.

 

NORTHERN IRELAND MOT EXEMPTION

Environment Minister, Alex Attwood, issued a statement on 29 April regarding exemption from annual MoT tests for pre-1960 vehicles following the introduction of the exemption in the rest of the UK in November last year. The proposed date of implementation in Northern Ireland is September 2013.

 

BUT the Northern Ireland proposal excludes vehicles ‘which have not undergone substantial change’ The Ministry have picked up the overly prescriptive definition contained in the original draft EU Roadworthiness Regulation, which has already been amended by the EU Council of Ministers and as can be seen above has still to make more progress before becoming a Directive with universally agreed wording. The full statement can be found on http://www.northernireland.gov.uk/news-doe-290413-historic-vehicles-exempt.

 

The FBHVC have written to the Minister, as we feel that whilst the EU Roadworthiness saga continues to develop, the incorporation of a draft definition is premature and is out of line with the majority of vehicles currently exempted in the rest of the UK. We have also pointed out the practical problems of making testers a judge (and jury) of historical alterations, many of which are undocumented.

 

NEW HANDBOOK FROM LARA

Traffic Management Hierarchy: Good Practice in Traffic Management on Unsealed Public Roads.

Recreational motoring on unsealed roads and byways is an emotive and complex issue. Some people think that motor vehicles should simply be banned from unsealed roads and nothing is easily going to change that view, but there is increasingly a ‘middle ground’ approach from highway authorities, which seeks to apply a considered ‘least restrictive approach’ philosophy to traffic management on our minor highways.

Over the last few years two new factors have come to bear upon this issue: the financial cuts suffered by councils, and the increasing frequency of extreme weather events, leading to waterlogged ground conditions far more often than a decade ago. This guidance is intended to be helpful to all concerned, and to avoid resort to the courts at great expense to all parties in terms of manpower and money. LARA believes that consensus management of motor traffic on unsealed roads, appropriate to the circumstances in each case, together with sufficient maintenance and a realistic expectation of what a byway should be like, is the way ahead. This is the first version of LARA’s Traffic Management Hierarchy, and they invite and welcome suggestions for improvement. LARA and its members are ready and willing to work with highway authorities, and hope that this positive attitude will be reciprocated.

Download Part 1 and Part 2 at www.laragb.org

 

ANY OTHER BUSINESS

The EU Roadworthiness proposals have understandably taken up a great deal of the legislation committee’s time but they have still been able to keep an eye on other legislation, some of which could certainly affect our hobby.

 

Waste Prevention Programme for England, DEFRA call for evidence: Our comment was simply to remind the Department that End of Life Vehicle legislation does not apply to historic vehicles. In line with waste prevention actions outlined in the Call for Evidence document, owners of such vehicles seek to recycle spares and historic vehicle parts where possible. Inevitably there are surplus parts which need to be disposed of at local council facilities and our request was that this should continue to be possible outside ELV legislation.

 

Red Tape Challenge: The next road transport phase is due to take place from 20 May to 17 June.

 

Street Trading and Pedlary Law: There were initially concerns that this might affect autojumbles etc. but after consultation with the Autojumblers Association it was decided that no submission was necessary.

 

DVLA Vehicle Online Services and Transforming DVLA Services: these are both closed consultations and there has been no more news to report.

 

Historic Vehicles MoT Exemption Review: having spoken to a number of specialist insurers there do not seem to be concerns about the pre-1960 MoT exemption at present. Any members who do experience problems should contact the Federation secretary.

 

Third Driving Licence Directive: clubs who cater for three-wheeled vehicles are worried that they may not attract new, younger members as they would now have to pass a motorcycle test at age 24 to be able to drive a three-wheeled car. The legislation committee have agreed to undertake further research into previous consultations and also the Construction and Use Regulations.                

 

Fuel topics: there have been no developments regarding ethanol in petrol since the last newsletter.

 

EU LEGISLATION

Roadworthiness Testing – EU institutions examine the Commission proposal

The European Parliament is progressing with its examinations of the European Commission’s draft Regulation to replace the 1996 Roadworthiness Testing Directive: http://ec.europa.eu/transport/road_safety/pdf/road_worthiness_package/proposal_for_a_regulation_on_periodic_roadworthiness_tests_en.pdf

 

The Transport Committee has been preparing its Report which will be presented to Parliament in July. As noted in the previous EU issues update, FIVA has contacted all the key MEPs on the Committee. The rapporteur, German MEP Werner Kuhn, recently submitted his draft report and his amendments certainly improved the definition proposed by the European Commission and demonstrated that he is sensitive to the case made by FIVA. However, FIVA remains concerned that even with these amendments the resultant definition of a historic vehicle would be too prescriptive and so would therefore result in some historic vehicles being excluded from definition. Accordingly, FIVA has continued to urge MEPs to table amendments to ensure that the Recitals and Articles of the adopted law more closely reflect the FIVA definition of a historic vehicle. While we have indications that such amendments may be tabled – they will only be published nearer the time of the next Transport Committee discussion, scheduled for 22-23 April (too late for inclusion in this newsletter).

 

FIVA raised other concerns about the proposed Regulation which are important to historic vehicles. The original 1996 Directive provided the principle that testing of historic vehicles under member states law should be done on the basis of standards which are not stricter than those which vehicles were originally designed to meet. Amendments proposed by both the European Council and Mr Kuhn pose the risk that the Regulation will introduce stricter safety and environmental standards so it is important that reference be maintained of this original guiding principle in the new law. FIVA has also noted that an amendment tabled by Mr Kuhn would prevent a person who maintains or repairs a vehicle from also being the inspector of that vehicle. If this amendment were to be adopted it would have a significant and negative impact on many garages across the EU which currently provide both services - allowed in many member states but not in others. A number of MEPs also expressed this concern during a debate on the proposal on 20 March in the EP Transport Committee: much time was devoted to it, indicating that the amendment will be opposed by many members.

 

The Transport Committee will vote on 30 May. The European Parliament 1-4 July Plenary Session is scheduled to adopted the EP First Reading opinion after which the European Council will consider again the proposal alongside the EP amendments.

 

DVLA

Nigel Harrison

 

MANUFACTURERS LETTERS FOR RECONSTRUCTED CLASSICS

In the last Newsletter, I indicated that a DVLA local office staff member had rejected a dating letter, saying that the owner should obtain (or attempt to obtain) a dating letter from the original manufacturer. My assessment, based on DVLA leaflet INF26, with the wordy title of Guidelines on how you can register kitcars and rebuilt or radically altered vehicles, was that this was an incorrect decision by the DVLA. Based on the following recent correspondence, reproduced below with DVLA at Swansea, it appears that DVLA have moved the goal posts.

 

‘There appears to be some confusion between dating certificates and the reconstructed classic category.

I should explain that dating evidence is necessary to support a range of vehicles coming forward for first registration, such as original vehicles that have lost their registration number. It has always been the case that the evidence should be obtained from the manufacturer where possible as advised in the INF 106 and V848 leaflets.

The Reconstructed Classic category was introduced following the 1996 review of the rebuilt, radically altered and kit vehicle procedures (INF 26) and is intended for the registration of vehicles which may not be completely original but could contain or comprise of genuine period components. A dating certificate alone is not sufficient evidence to register these vehicles.

The appropriate club must authenticate that the vehicle represents the marque concerned and that it has been built from period components of the same specification, all over 25 years old.’

 

As background information, leaflet INF 106, is called ‘How to import your vehicle into Great Britain’, and V848 is called ‘How to register your “old” vehicle.’

 

I also paid a visit to my DVLA local office, who indicated that there has been a longstanding DVLA Swansea requirement that the owner needs to check first to see if the original manufacturer can produce a dating letter, but this is not something that the DVLA local office has insisted upon in the past. A dating letter from the appropriate club has (until recently) been sufficient to date the vehicle. However, there has been a recent instruction from DVLA Swansea, to the DVLA local offices, to insist that the original manufacturer is contacted for a dating letter. This requirement is said to be implied in DVLA leaflet V848: ‘You will need to provide proof of the year of manufacture. The chassis/frame number can often be used to establish this. If the manufacturer is no longer in existence, many vehicle enthusiast clubs can provide dating certificates to support a V55/5 application for an age-related number.’

 

There is a DVLA Swansea staff member tasked with the job of writing out to manufacturers to try and establish who has historic records. That particular task is a minefield, seeing that the holder of the current manufacturer trade mark could well be a completely different organisation to the organisation that holds the original manufacturers records. The current manufacturing base might be in India, but the only legacy records exist in microfilm form by a specialist club in the UK. The year range of historical records held by a particular manufacturer could well be a moving target, seeing that some manufacturers will dispose of old records on a routine basis. Also, records can suddenly disappear due to flooding or fire.

 

It has been suggested to DVLA that if a vehicle is more than 25 years old, that the requirement to contact the original manufacturer should be waived, seeing that a significant proportion of manufacturers do not support vehicles more than 25 years old. To date, DVLA have not responded to that proposal.

 

The enforced DVLA requirement that manufacturer records take precedence over a clubs dating letter, is a significant extra hurdle for owners, at a time when DVLA are indicating that they want to streamline their services. By the time this Newsletter is distributed, the Federation will have had a meeting with DVLA to discuss this issue, amongst others. I would anticipate that an update would be in the next Newsletter, and please keep an eye on the website for updates.

Changes to MoT tests, from 20 March 2013
James Fairchild
There are some changes due to take effect to the MoT test for all classes of vehicles from 20 March 2013. I will leave out references to items that obviously don't relate to vehicles constructed in the mid-1980’s or earlier, like electronic stability control, supplementary restraint systems and will simply suggest that those wanting to see how the changes might affect current vehicle may wish to search online for 2010/48/EU (the directive number) and view detailed information themselves
I recommend that all vehicle owners with reasonable technical knowledge download a copy of the current MOT manual for their type of vehicle.

To do this, navigate to http://www.dft.gov.uk/vosa/publications/manualsandguides/vehicletestingmanualsandguides.htm and a variety of options will be listed here. The truck document is ‘2013 Consolidated HGV Inspection Manual’ (which downloads as a PDF) and for older cars and motorbikes, click "Mot Inspection Manuals and Guides" about halfway down. For newer vehicles there are manuals for Individual/Single Vehicle Approval. For preserved buses, you have the choice of the 2013 Consolidated PSV Inspection Manual for class 6 vehicles, or the manual for class 5, which is contained within the same document as for cars.

 

As an aside, these documents download (and open) fine on a smartphone or a tablet, and some people may find it useful to keep a copy saved on their mobile device, for easy reference at the roadside or in the workshop. Anyone without internet access is advised to visit either a friend or relative, or their local library.
In each of these documents, there are a number of reasons for failure that are listed in blue type. These items are advisory points (until 19 March 2013) but by the time you receive this newsletter they will be fail items. Note that files with ‘March update’ in their title have just gone live (as this article was being written) these however do not have the blue type, and hence do not easily show the changes. The list of items that follow is in the (approximate) order of the manuals.

 

Registration plates front and rear are now a requirement (hitherto, it was possible to test a vehicle just on its chassis number) and must conform to the regulations in force when the vehicle was new.


Lamps: we have a new reason for failure being ‘the front and rear position lamps do not illuminate with a single operation of the switch’ (side lights and tail lights) which for commercial vehicles fitted with them, also needs to switch on the position lights (which are the front and rear upper marker lights of the 1980’s onwards).

On a vehicle manufactured after April 1986, the main beam 'tell-tale' is required to work, that is to say the blue indication on the dashboard must work.
There is a new section entitled ‘Electrical Wiring and Battery’. The reasons for failure here seem common-sense. Included here is battery security and whether the battery is leaking.


There is a check on the steering lock (on vehicles where this was fitted as original equipment), both that it doesn't deploy with the engine running and that it does deploy with the key out (the manual states that where it isn't clear whether one was fitted as OE, the benefit of the doubt should be given.

 

The presence of steering lock stops (where originally fitted as standard) is verified (previously it was just the security and correct adjustment of those fitted), as is power steering fluid level.

 

The brake fluid warning lamp becomes a testable item where fitted. This may be combined with other things such as worn pads or parking brake applied.

 

Exhaust brakes (HGV/PSV) inoperative or removed are reasons for failure if fitted as a mandatory fitment (if not, removal may be acceptable if the notifiable alteration procedure is followed).


The speedometer section now applies to all vehicles and not just class 5 (in the detail, we are reminded that this is ‘all vehicles first used on or after 01 October 1937’).
Engine mountings (including gearbox mounts where they provide essential support for the engine) are a reason for failure.

 

Steps and stairs (on class 5 vehicles) require more thorough checking.


The adjustment of the driver’s seat is also checked (specifically, that it can adjust, where adjustments are so provided).


A reason for failure (class 5) is any occasional or crew seat that doesn't flip up automatically


A catalytic converter missing where one was fitted as standard (I wasn't going to include this item, until I saw on Wikipedia that the automobile cat was actually invented in 1973, and initially fitted to American cars of the mid 1970s)


In July 2013, some brake requirements will change (a higher efficiency requirement for cars July 2010 onwards, as well as an amended imbalance standard for cars of all ages).


By the end of 2013, a further small change is that the mileage (currently not included on HGV/PSV certificates) will be included along with the country of vehicle registration.


In summary, a vehicle doesn't need to be fitted with anything that wasn't OE when it was new, however more components that were originally fitted to a car will be checked. In reality this shouldn't cause any burden to the owner of a well-maintained vehicle. There is a large section (which I have omitted from the above) about ABS, EBS etc and one would expect that the owners of classic vehicles fitted with it (which in Europe, started with the Mark III Granada of 1985, badged Scorpio on the continent) ensure this system is in full working order.


We ask all member clubs to reinforce that vehicles must be kept in a good standard of repair whenever they venture out onto the road. Vehicles that benefit from the pre-1960 MoT exemption still need to comply with all parts of the MoT manual (subject to date exemptions etc.) and if deficiencies are identified at the road side (whether in a car or a HGV) the vehicle driver and owner could be subject to VOSA or police sanction.

 

FUEL NEWS

At the beginning of March the FBHVC sent representatives to the latest fuel stakeholder meeting, held at the DfT and chaired by the Managing Director of the Low Carbon Vehicle Partnership. This meeting was mainly concerned with the best way to launch E10 fuel in the UK and was attended by representatives from the DfT, Low CVP, fuel companies, the AA, RAC and the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders. The FBHVC was the sole voice representing the historic vehicle movement

Right at the start of the meeting the DfT expressed the opinion that ‘the time is not right’ to introduce E10 and ‘the government preference is that E10 will not be introduced soon’. However the introduction will be a purely commercial decision by the suppliers, who DfT hope ‘would be cognisant of the impact on consumers’. The British Standard for the labelling of the fuel on the forecourt has now been agreed and in theory the fuel could now be available at the pumps, albeit with very clear warnings on the label about possible compatibility problems.

 

Looking back at case histories of the introduction of E10 in Europe there are lessons which have been learned about advance publicity and the amount of information that needs to be available to the public before the launch. Retailers have been told not to answer compatibility questions – the idea is to get consumers educated before they get to the E10 pump. SMMT and the LowCVP do have concerns about the lack of information they have on compatibility with historic vehicles and expressed a desire to deal with the Federation. We will of course assist in any way we can. A rough rule of thumb would seem to be that if a vehicle uses carburettors then it is unlikely to be compatible with E10 petrol.

Until the end of 2013 protection grade fuel will definitely be available: this will be guaranteed to contain a significantly lower proportion of ethanol. At the end of the year the agreement to supply this fuel officially ends but the Federation will campaign to ensure its continued availability.

 

Scenic Tours, an update

Simon Fowler, MSA

Following the article in the last newsletter Simon Fowler, Competitions and Clubs Manager at MSA has sent us further clarification and the MSA website FAQs have also been updated.

 

Authorisation is required by the Motor Vehicles (Competitions & Trials) Regulations 1969 (as amended) for competitive events on the Public Highway.

The vast majority of scenic tours organised by motor clubs are non-competitive and therefore do not require authorisation. Organisers should however be aware that if they introduce an element of competition to their event it would then come under the remit of the legislation which is part of the Road Traffic Act. For instance, if you included some treasure hunt type clues or had awards or penalties the event would become subject to authorisation of the route. Authorisation of events in England and Wales are administered by the Competition Authorisation Office (CAO) at the MSA, Scotland has a separate office at the Royal Scottish Automobile Club http://www.rsacmotorsport.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/RouteAuthorisation.

 

The MSA considers the presentation of ‘finishers’ awards’ an indication that competition has taken place. To avoid an event being classed as a competition do not use the word ‘award’ when describing any plaques, certificates, mementos or souvenirs that may be given to those taking part. 

 

Within the legislation, Regulation 5 permits certain competitive events to be automatically authorised, so there is no requirement for formal authorisation. This is where the 12 cars rule comes in. You can organise an event with a competitive element which is automatically authorised if the total number of vehicles does not exceed 12.

There are details of the Legislation and the Authorisation procedures on the MSA  website http://www.msauk.org/site/cms/contentviewarticle.asp?article=760 and on the FAQ pages http://www.msauk.org/site/cms/contentChapterView.asp?Chapter=288

 

It should also be noted that this competitive element can also affect an entrant’s Road Traffic Act insurance as most policies specifically exclude cover for competitions. We would advise all competitors to check their policies before entering such events.

 

MSA Clubs

In addition to noting the above, any MSA recognised clubs who organise a scenic tour will require a Certificate of Exemption which is a type of permit. The MSA term these types of event as touring assemblies and they have to be non-competitive to comply with the MSA General Regulations.

 

 

Non-MSA Registered Club

MSA

Registered Club

TOURING ASSEMBLIES

Is an MSA Permit/Certificate of Exemption required?

No

Yes

Route Authorisation required

No

Yes

Do I need to contact the Route Liaison Officer?

No

Yes

TREASURE HUNTS (12 CARS OR FEWER)

Is an MSA Permit/Certificate of Exemption required?

No

Yes

Route Authorisation required

No

No

Do I need to contact the Route Liaison Officer?

No

Yes

TREASURE HUNTS (13 CARS OR MORE)

Is an MSA Permit/Certificate of Exemption required?

No

Yes

Route Authorisation required

Yes

Yes

Do I need to contact the Route Liaison Officer?

No

Yes

CONCOURS

Is an MSA Permit/Certificate of Exemption required?

No

Yes

Route Authorisation required

No

No

Do I need to contact the Route Liaison Officer?

No

No

 

As a postscript - FBHVC legislation director, David Hurley has observed that the interpretation of what makes an event ‘competitive’ under the legislation may require further examination, particularly for those clubs not recognised by the MSA. The Federation will seek to clarify this in the next issue.

 

RESEARCH

 

Two Important New Economic Impact Reports Published
Local economic impact assessments for the International Autojumble at Beaulieu and for the Goodwood Revival Meeting (both of which took place in September 2012) have been published by the Federation in a collaboration with the University of Brighton.

Beaulieu

The Beaulieu study found that the annual Beaulieu International Autojumble created a local economic benefit of £3 million to the New Forest area. It further concluded that the event provided direct temporary employment in the region for over 220 people and also benefited local hotels and guest houses, being directly responsible for over 11,000 person nights of accommodation.

It is truly international and in 2012, the year of this study, it attracted more than 38,000 visitors, nearly a quarter of whom came from overseas.

 

Held over three days in September, the autojumble was responsible for over £11 million turnover for the national economy and contributed over half a million pounds to the UK Treasury through VAT.

The report was unveiled in February this year at a press conference held at the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu by Geoff Smith, vice president of FBHVC and the project’s leader.

 

Goodwood

The Goodwood Revival Study was released at the press launch for the 2013 Festival of Speed and Revival Meeting this month. It found that the annual Goodwood Revival brings a conservative £12 million of business to the local area, including Chichester and Bognor Regis to the south of Goodwood, and Petersfield and Midhurst to the north.


In addition, the FBHVC and University of Brighton research found that the 2012 Goodwood Revival was responsible for a healthy £32 million turnover for the national UK economy, net of VAT, with over £4 million generated in VAT to Government revenue. The event also led to direct temporary employment for more than 350 people.


The independent study revealed that the Goodwood Revival generates over 23,000 ‘person nights’ of accommodation for local hotels and guests houses, plus a further 25,000 person nights locally outside of the 20km radius study area.

 

These two reports are the latest in a series of economic impact studies undertaken by the Federation to provide data to underpin its work in support of the historic vehicle movement.

 

Copies of the reports were sent to all member clubs, museums and traders in March. All recent research reports are available in their entirety in the Research section of the website at www.fbhvc.co.uk

 

 

 

LEGISLATION & FUELS

David Hurley

EU Proposals on Roadworthiness Testing - A curate's egg

FBHVC’s objections to the proposal to replace the current Roadworthiness Testing Directive with a Regulation have been well covered in the two most recent newsletters. Since the last issue went to press, there have been several developments some of which are clearly beneficial to the historic vehicle movement, others less so.

 

First, the European Presidency acknowledged the misgivings of many Member States whose governments objected to the loss of national flexibility that would result from the change from a Directive to a Regulation and on 16 November put forward a revised draft in the form of a Directive. This draft dropped the proposal to require mandatory testing for trailers of less than 750kg, changed the definition of vehicles that may be considered ‘of historic interest’ and, crucially, dropped the proposal that roadworthiness tests should include an element of checking for conformity with original standards. The table below shows the relevant changes.

 

Please note that neither version of the text says that historic vehicles should be exempt from testing, but both say that Member States may set their own requirements for historic vehicles that fall within Article 3(7).

 

On 26 November, the Department for Transport hosted a meeting for stakeholders to discuss and review the EU Presidency’s amendments. The historic vehicle movement was represented by David Hurley and Bob Owen, the FBHVC’s director and deputy director of legislation, as well as Andrew Turner, FIVA’s legislation consultant, Mike Stripe from the Vintage Sports Car Club and Colin Billington from the National Association of Road Transport Museums.

 

DfT officials fully supported the proposed change to Article 3(9) as it would enable Member States to test vehicles for roadworthiness without having to verify compliance with specifications and standards that may no longer exist. It was clear that the officials were very much on ‘our’ side as far as testing for historic vehicles is concerned and wished very much to be able to maintain the status quo – in other words they were keen that the government should be able to maintain the recently introduced exemption from testing for all pre-1960 vehicles. The officials clearly believed that the changes shown in the table would achieve this end, but were unable to explain how they would be able to transpose the requirements of the Directive in to UK law without also including the limiting conditions included in the revised Article 3(7).

 

The matter was discussed at a meeting of the All Party Parliamentary Historic Vehicle Group that took place late in November at which the chairman, Greg Knight MP, agreed to seek a meeting with Stephen Hammond, Minister of State for Transport, so that FBHVC’s concerns could be set out in detail before the proposed Directive went through the next stage in the EU legislative process – a Transport Council meeting on 20 December.

 

A meeting with Mr Hammond took place on 13 December where a delegation from FBHVC and APPHVG explained the concerns. These were reinforced with a short, but detailed, briefing paper. Mr Hammond said that great progress had already been made and that he was confident that there will be sufficient latitude in the Directive to allow the UK government to adopt a reasonable and wide interpretation of the rules.

 

By the time the Transport Council meeting took place on 20 December, further amendments to the Presidency text of 16 November had been proposed (including one to remove trailers under 3.5 tonnes from the scope of the Directive), but none were relevant to historic vehicles. The official press release and webcast of the meeting show the Council agreeing to this revised text. Historic vehicles were mentioned only once, in passing, by Sweden. Nonetheless, late on 20 December, the DfT press office issued a release to selected motoring journalists that began as follows:

Transport Minister Stephen Hammond has helped secure a crucial deal protecting British motorists and businesses from controversial, economy-damaging European Commission proposals for road vehicle testing.

 

Under the original plans, millions of British caravan and trailer owners would have been forced to put their vehicles through MoT tests, while classic and historic vehicle owners faced having their vehicles taken off the road if they had been modified – even if only slightly – with components such as new indicators.

 

There is no doubt that the revised text approved by the Council has answered the most serious concerns that FBHVC has identified in the past and does most of what the Minister has claimed, but the specific concerns discussed at the meeting on 13 December (as detailed in the briefing paper that can be found under the news item posted in December at www.fbhvc.co.uk) remain. The qualifications in the text of Article 3(7) are unchanged, and it is difficult to see how the current exemption from testing for all pre-1960 vehicles could continue when the Directive allows exemption only for those in their original state and without substantial change to the technical characteristics of any major components, including body.

 

FBHVC has argued consistently that the only practical definition of an historic vehicle for the purposes of this type of legislation is one based on date of manufacture alone. It will now seek to persuade MPs and MEPs of this position before the proposed Directive is considered by the European Parliament later in the year.

 

A meeting in Brussels between FIVA legislation chairman, Tiddo Bresters, and Andrew Turner, Malcolm Harbour and other MEPs has been arranged with the Raconteur on this topic on 23 January 2013. Andrew, Malcolm and Tiddo will all have the FBHVC submission paper we gave to our Minister in December.

 

 

 

 

Original text from 13 Jul 2012

Revised text from EU Presidency 16 Nov 2012

Article 2 - Scope

Article 2 - Scope

2. This Regulation shall not apply to:

Vehicles of historic interest

2. Member States may exempt the following vehicles registered in their territory from the application of this Directive: vehicles of historic interest

3. Member States may introduce national
requirements concerning roadworthiness tests for vehicles listed in paragraph 2 registered in their territory.

3. Member States may introduce national
requirements concerning roadworthiness tests for vehicles not covered by the scope of this Directive or vehicles listed in paragraph 2.

Article 3 - Definitions

Article 3 - Definitions

(7)‘vehicle of historic interest’ means any vehicle which fulfils all the following conditions:- It was manufactured at least 30 years ago, It is maintained by use of replacement parts which reproduce the historic components of the vehicle;- It has not sustained any change in the technical characteristics of its main components such as engine, brakes, steering or suspension and It has not been changed in its appearance;

(7) ‘vehicle of historic interest’ means any vehicle which has been declared as historical by a Member State or one of its appointed authorising body (sic) and fulfils all the following conditions:
It was manufactured or registered for the first time at least 30 years ago, Its type is no longer in production, It is in its original state and has not sustained substantial changes in the technical characteristic of its main components such as engine, brakes, steering, suspension or body.

(9) ‘roadworthiness test’ means a verification that the parts and components of a vehicle comply with its safety and environmental characteristics in force at the time of approval, first registration or entry in to service, as well as at the time of
 retrofitting;

(9) ‘roadworthiness test’ means an inspection to ensure that a vehicle is safe to be used on public roads and complies with required environmental characteristics;

 

Voluntary MoT Tests

At the NEC show last November several members raised queries regarding the operation of voluntary MoT tests.

 

All testing stations were notified by Special Notice from VOSA that as and from the date of exemption for pre-1960 vehicles, these owners can apply for a voluntary test. These can be booked in the normal way and charged the normal fee (or lower if the garage is giving special offers) and garages cannot refuse to test them. Please notify the secretary if any garages are refusing to conduct a voluntary test.

 

Those few vehicles that have always been exempt from MoT, mainly specialised vehicles for which no manuals exist and fall outside testing protocols, are not eligible for voluntary testing. (These vehicles are listed on the V112 form, the Declaration of Exemption from MoT Testing.) However DfT have been under pressure from the EU and are starting to consider reducing the approximately 30 types of exempt vehicles (most of which are now built on modern truck/bus chassis) down to only those machines with specially tailor made layouts i.e. extremely low volume production.

 

Any voluntary test should be conducted as previously practiced and the normal pass or failure notification will be issued together with ‘advisories’ if appropriate. It therefore follows that an electronic record will be held on the VOSA database, which the enforcement teams of VOSA and the Police may interrogate. It is plainly not acceptable for owners to ignore a failure and continue to use a vehicle without correcting a known fault and use an excuse of: “Well, I need not have had it tested anyway”. Good practice is to resubmit for a retest after the rectification of a failure fault.

 

Military Vehicle Export Licenses

In February 2010 we published details of the Open General Export Licence (Historic Military Vehicles and Artillery Pieces). The Export Control Organisation (part of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) has recently amended the Export Control Order allowing an exemption from the OGEL for temporary export of historic military vehicles within certain conditions. The important paragraphs are as follows:

 

1. This Licence permits, without further authority but subject to certain conditions, the temporary exportation to EU destinations, Channel Islands or Norway, for a period not exceeding 3 calendar months, a range of unclassified military goods including vehicles manufactured 50 years or more before the date of exportation. The conditions include that the exporter shall not sell, dispose or transfer to any person ownership of the goods or any interest in them or take any other action which may have the result of impeding or diminishing his power to ensure their safe return to the UK.

 

2. A licence exemption is in place which allows the temporary export of historic military vehicles to certain named destinations (Belgium, France or Germany) when certain specified conditions can be met. An export licence issued by the Export Control Organisation is not required if you can meet the specified exemption conditions and are exporting historic military vehicles (ML6) to the named destinations. This exemption is specified in Article 14a which is made in Export Control (Amendment)(No 2) Order 2012 (SI 2012/1910). This amends the Export Control Order 2008.

The order specifies:

“14(A) – (1) The prohibition on the export of military goods in article 3

does not apply to the export of a vehicle or component falling within entry ML6 in Schedule 2 provided that the following conditions are met.

(2) The conditions are that –

(a) the vehicle or component was manufactured more than 50 years before the date of exportation

(b) the exportation is to a destination in Belgium, France or Germany

(c) the exportation is for the purpose of a military re-enactment, commemorative event or recreational activity, and

(d) the vehicle or component is to be returned to the United Kingdom within 3 months of the date of exportation.”

 

This export authorisation is valid for exports to the following destinations:

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Channel Islands, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden.

 

For further information there is a comprehensive FAQ section to be found at: https://www.gov.uk/open-general-licences-an-overview

To register go to: https://www.spire.bis.gov.uk

Please note that if you are searching any of the gov.uk pages you will need to enter ‘OGL’ and not OGEL to find the information.

 

DVLA

New V765/1 List

A new V765/1 list of authorised clubs was published by DVLA on 7 January. The list is available on the DVLA website: http://www.dft.gov.uk/dvla

 

Any club that wishes to join the scheme should apply to the DVLA. The Federation receives very many requests for application forms, usually erroneously passed on to us by DVLA themselves. However, we do not carry copies of the application form which is only available from the DVLA. Any member club which has difficulty obtaining a form is welcome to contact the secretary who will be able to pass on details to the correct department within DVLA.

 

DVLA Warns Motorists to check the certificate of entitlement for a personalised registration number.

DVLA has warned motorists to check the Certificate of Entitlement (V750) when purchasing a personalised registration (number plate) from a private seller after 900 blank certificates were stolen. Motorists are advised not to purchase the registration number if the serial number of the V750 certificate falls within the range 5930101 to 5931000. The serial number is located in the top right corner of the certificate.

 

Post Office® Wins Contract to Provide DVLA Services

On 13 November the Secretary of State for Transport announced the intention to let the contract for the Front of Office Counter Services (FOCS) to the Post Office. The current arrangement between DVLA and Post Office expires on 31 March 2013. A new seven year contract will run from 1 April 2013 until 31 March 2020, with the option to extend by up to three additional years.

The Post Office has provided face-to-face counter services for Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) collection since 1972 under a series of contracts with DVLA, mainly for VED collection. In 2010 the contract was extended and the Post Office was able to check details and collect a customer’s photograph for the ‘Ten Year Renewal’ photocard licence transaction.

 

The scope of the contract is for existing and new FOCS, including applying for tax discs and driving licences. The Post Office will also provide some services currently available through DVLA local offices, such as, the provision of duplicate licences and licensing of heavy goods vehicles. These additional services will become available

through designated branches of the Post Office network giving greater accessibility to motorists. DVLA also provides for a further extension of services through this contract. For example, further driver transactions and, possibly in future, road tax refunds and other vehicle transactions. The contract also gives scope for the winning bidder to provide FOCS for other government departments, an expressed intent of Government for some time.

 

Savings to DVLA are expected to be in the region of £13 to £15 million per annum and wider savings are possible through economies of scale for similar services across Government in the future.

 

Introducing DVLA’s new logo

In common with all government departments, DVLA is getting a new logo which introduces a more consistent unified approach to identities and branding. The logo will aid transparency, cut future costs and support digital communications.

Transition to the new logo will be gradual to minimise cost, so for a while both old and new logos will be used at the same time.

The new logo has three parts:

• a green coloured stripe (representing the Department for Transport)

• the Royal Crest

• the Department name.

The Royal Crest is the basis of the existing HM Government brand and is already identified by the public as a sign of government.

 

NEWS

New look for FBHVC marks silver jubilee

Geoff Lancaster

In July this year the Federation celebrates 25 successful years representing the owners of historic vehicles and the considerable industry and employment which has grown up around the historic vehicle movement. Our raison d’être has always been to uphold the right of our members to continue to enjoy their vehicles as they were supposed to be used, on the roads. This right persists to this day in the UK despite challenges along the way from regulatory authorities in Westminster and latterly from Brussels.

 

Over time the challenges to our rights of access have become more complex and we have reformed and modernised our approach to our lobbying activities accordingly. Reflecting on this and the opportunity provided by the jubilee we have decided to bring our visual identity right up into the 21st century. From 1 February we will have a bright, new identity featuring British Racing Green to emphasise our national heritage and a new strap line ‘Yesterday’s Vehicles on Tomorrow’s Roads’ stating our primary objective, clearly and reinforced on all our messaging.

 

Clarity of communication is essential in all our external dealings, none more so than with national and specialist press, and we believe this new look will serve us well in this endeavour.

 

We are dedicated to represent all types of historic vehicles, so to remind our audiences of our scope we will always incorporate the supporting banner shown at the foot of this page. Member clubs who wish to acknowledge their FBHVC allegiance may use a logo designed specifically for their vehicle sector, be it motor cycle, car, buses and coaches, steam powered, commercial, military or agricultural. It is important to us that our activities are inclusive of these interests and thus it is appropriate that our new identity signals this fact.

In February we will relaunch our website in the new livery. There will be many other new features of the site which will still be accessed at www.fbhvc.co.uk   

 

Calling all Classic Vehicle Enthusiasts - FBHVC NEEDS YOU!

In our last Newsletter you saw the results to date of the responses to the questionnaire soliciting opinions on the availability of specialist restoration skills for historic vehicles. The UK really should be at the forefront of providing such opinion rather than merely bit-part players. So, in an attempt to gather more opinions, I am going to continue with the questionnaire process during 2013. I shall open up the questionnaire to all historic vehicle enthusiasts in the UK via the QR Code or tiny URL (shown opposite) in some of our national journals, so please encourage your friends and colleagues to look out for it during 2013. Hopefully this approach will encourage more of you involved in the

historic vehicle movement to express your concerns about the future.

 

We do need your help to achieve our aims of skills preservation and you, the enthusiasts and owners of historic vehicles, are key stakeholders. The questionnaire, which can be completed via the internet, can be completely anonymous as required and will be evaluated by FBHVC and FIVA.

 

Hence the FBHVC would like all owners and users of classic cars, motorcycles, commercial and military vehicles etc. to take part in this survey. The questionnaire only takes a few minutes to complete and you will be helping to maintain your freedom to use yesterday’s vehicles on tomorrow’s roads. So please either enter http://tinyurl.com/8cpqxvf on your browser or scan the QR code with your Smartphone and you will be automatically directed to the questionnaire.

 

During 2013, I shall be expanding our search for such information to the trade and professional service providers to establish their views on the same subject. Small and very small enterprises are, I believe, the most under threat as the larger businesses can usually fend for themselves when times get difficult. As mentioned earlier the information gained will be used as a basis for investigating the possibility of providing relevant specialist training opportunities for young trainees and apprentices.

 

HERITAGE, CULTURE & MUSEUMS

Celebrating Motoring Heritage

English Heritage celebrates the age of the motor car with 13 new listings and a new book published through Yale

 

From turn of the century “motor stables”, purpose built for one of the men who introduced the motorcar to Britain, via the original 1909 home of Morris Motors in Oxford, to the air-travel inspired 1960s Forton Tower on the M6, English Heritage’s project to understand and protect car-related structures and landscapes has resulted in 13 buildings being listed by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport on the advice of English Heritage. An exciting book, Carscapes: The Motor Car, Architecture and Landscape in England written by English Heritage experts Kathryn A. Morrison and John Minnis, is also published for The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art by Yale University Press.

 

These 13 buildings, all listed at Grade II and dating from the turn of the century to the 1960s, chart the rise of motoring from an aspirational pastime for the few to a necessity for the many. Among the new listings are a grand Edwardian building decorated with stone tyre motifs in Kensington, a First World War air hangar converted to service cars, rural 1920s filling stations mimicking barns to blend in with the countryside, and a futuristic garage from the 1960s. These often little-known buildings provide a rare glimpse into England’s motoring past and how its landscape and architecture were re-engineered to accommodate cars. 

 

Heritage Minister Ed Vaizey said: “There was an undeniably romantic flavour to motoring in the UK during the first half of the twentieth century.  Cars looked distinctive and many designs we now think of as classics were born in that era.  What’s less well recorded, however, are the buildings and structures that provided the setting and infrastructure for the golden age of the motor car.  These listings, and the book being published alongside them, go some way to filling that gap. Cars are safer these days and driving far less of an adventure, but some of us still like to embrace our inner Mr. Toad, and so it’s great that our motoring heritage is properly recognised in this way.”

 

Dr Simon Thurley, Chief Executive of English Heritage, said: “The motor car, like the railways before it, changed the world in which we live. Now, in an age when it is common to blame cars for blighting our environment, it is time to recognise and appreciate the positive contribution they have made to England’s heritage. This book represents the fruit of a major English Heritage research project, part of our commitment to understanding the heritage of the 20th century. We expect that over the next few years it will improve our ability to protect early motoring structures in England.”

 

“This project is one of many English Heritage is carrying out which explores the historic environment according to themes and puts forward proposals for their better protection, including designation.”

 

The book sets out to illuminate the century-long process that saw the world around us re-engineered for cars. Exploring the history of various building types and structures associated with the car - filling stations, garages, car showrooms, car parks, motels, roadhouses, highways, bridges, and even signage - the book looks at how the car became such a powerful catalyst for change.

 

In May 2012, English Heritage announced the Grade II listing of the Markham Moor canopy in Nottinghamshire and the Red Hill Mobil canopies in Leicester. Other motoring related buildings that have already been listed include the former premises of the car dealer and manufacturer Rootes in Maidstone, Kent. Built in 1937-8 and Grade II listed, this is an excellent example of the large moderne style garages popular in the 1930s with an eye-catching vertical fin, rounded corners and extensive showrooms and workshops. The former Antiquarius building just off the Kings Road in London, where in 1919 a new garage was disguised to look like an “olde English“ inn, and the Forge Garage in Penshurst, Kent,  where an old blacksmiths was converted into a garage in 1965, are two other examples of buildings that represent our varied and much loved motoring heritage.

 

Sir David Salomons’ motor stables, Broomhill, Kent, 1900

The motor stables are some of the earliest purpose-built examples of their type, built by Sir David Salomons who put on the first public demonstration of motor cars in Great Britain in 1895. The motor stables were designed and fitted out as a complex dedicated to the management and maintenance of motor vehicles. Executed with a high quality of materials and craftsmanship, Salomons used these buildings as an exemplar in his writings on motoring. The stables are almost as Salomons would have left them, the appearance and fittings largely unaltered since the 1900s.

 

The former Morris Garage at 21 Longwall Street, Oxford, 1909-10

Built for William Morris as his first purpose-built motor garage and the birthplace of the bullnose Morris Oxford, this building is a key site in the development of the British motor industry. Although converted into student accommodation, the façade of the building has survived remarkably well. The sophisticated neo-Georgian facade built of high-quality materials provided a respectable and aesthetically acceptable face to an industrial site among Oxford University’s ancient buildings.

 

Empire House, 230-244 Brompton Road, London, 1909- 1916

Built as the offices of the Continental Tyre and Rubber Company, this is an extremely opulent piece of street architecture and a testament to the growth of motoring in Edwardian England. Sculptural decoration all around the outside of the building featuring tyres in the place of classical wreaths celebrates the company’s products.

 

Savoy Garage, Blackpool, 1914-15

Originally built to serve the now closed Savoy Hotel, the garage dates to the earliest days of motoring in England and unlike many of its contemporaries, has changed little over the years. It has kept a number of its original features, including a very rare motor car lift and turntable. The building also represents the impact of the burgeoning motor industry on the development of seaside resorts, such as Blackpool, which became more accessible with the increase of popularity in motoring.

 

Much Marcle Garage, Herefordshire, moved and re-used as a garage in 1926

A WWI aircraft hangar re-used as a service station, Much Marcle is a rare example of a building adapted for use for the repair of motor vehicles as the early national road network grew. It retains all of the 1926 internal features and the building itself is an increasingly rare example of an aircraft hangar dating from 1917-1920.

 

The former Colvin Bros. filling station, Rother, East Sussex built in 1926

One of a very small number of early filling stations to survive, the station was designed to fit in to its rural landscape. In doing this, the station reflected the ideas of the newly formed Council for the Preservation of Rural England on good garage design.

 

The East Sheen Filling Station, Surrey, c. 1926

This is one of the earliest surviving examples in Britain of a purpose-built filling station and a pioneering instance of an “American-style” filling station, with canopy and office under a single roof.  The design of the building is of considerable charm, its external details echoing the neighbouring suburban buildings and reflecting an attempt to give the motor car a reassuringly domestic face.

 

Colyford Filling Station, East Devon, 1927-8

This is a rare example of a 1920s architect-designed filling station with many significant features surviving, including 1950s Avery Hardoll pumps, two of which are original and thought to be the best still in their original setting. The design was intended to be sympathetic to its rural location, as set out in guides such as the Design and Industries Association’s “The Village Pump: A Guide to Better Garages” written in 1930.

 

Wellingore Garage, Lincolnshire, 1933

Built to designs by F. Glanville Goodin to look like a barn with a half-hipped roof, this design aimed to calm the public concerns that new motoring buildings were a blight on the rural landscape. The garage is a rare survival of this type of building.

 

The former Pennine Tower Restaurant on the north-bound side of Forton Service Area (now known as Lancaster Service Area), 1964-5

As Britain’s motorway network began to flourish so too did motorway service stations. Forton is one of the earliest and most striking examples of this new type of post-war building with a unique 22 meter high tower and a cantilevered restaurant and sun deck. Forton demonstrated a new popularist architecture ideally suited to the democratic accessibility of the motorway. The Pennine Tower Restaurant acted both as a beacon to attract passing motorists and as a glamorous vantage point from which they were able to enjoy spectacular views of the surrounding countryside and motorway below. Reminiscent of an airport control tower, Forton also evoked the glamour of 1960s air travel and followed the trend of constructing towers with restaurants and observation platforms as seen at the BT Tower in London of 1961-4 and the Tower of Cairo of 1956-c1961.

 

Drive it Day, 21 April 2013

Keith Gibbins

Drive It Day encourages our 500-plus club members and their supporters plus other historic vehicle enthusiasts to use yesterday’s two, three, four or more wheeled vehicles for a day to celebrate the UK’s transport heritage at its finest.

All owners of historic cars are encouraged to take to the roads on the 21 April to demonstrate how many historic and interesting machines are still on the road today.

 

Most FBHVC members already have planned to make the most of this day by using the public roads, meeting at local venues, places of interest, including museums such as Beaulieu, National Trust and heritage properties, transport cafes, like the Ace, local beauty spots or even car parks.

 

The FBHVC team will be attending a number of the many events and in celebration of our 25th anniversary we have made special arrangements with the Heritage Motor Centre in Gaydon, which is home to the world’s largest collection of British historic cars. Centrally positioned Gaydon would make a good start point, intermediate waypoint to visit en-route and an excellent location to finish a day’s run.

 

In support of Drive it Day, the Heritage Motor Centre will offer a special admission price of £5 for museum entry for those arriving in historic vehicles. In addition a discounted rate will be offered for the Land Rover Experience. This is a ride, as a passenger, through the steep and twisting multi-terrain track, either in a modern Discovery or an early Series III.

 

Scenic Tours

Paul Loveridge

What is a Scenic Tour and what do I need to take part?

Scenic tours are a social motoring event open to vehicles of 30 years and over. There is no competition element to a tour.

 

Objective

The objective is for classic car owners to use their cars on an organised, social event following a pre-determined route. They are suitable for families, with youngsters under ten having proved capable of reading a road book on past events.

 

Vehicles

These events are usually open to vehicles of thirty years and over. Later vehicles of interest may be allowed to take part; however this is down to the individual event organiser’s discretion.

 

The Event

The average tour is approximately 100 miles long with comfort/refreshment breaks. There is usually the opportunity to visit places of interest along the route. The entry fee usually includes all refreshments associated with the event and normally a commemorative rally plate. You do not need to be a member of a motor club to take part.

Route

The route is usually defined by tulip diagrams contained in an easy to use road book. The tulip diagram originated from the Tulip Rally in the early 1950s. It is basically a line diagram of a road junction with an arrow head designating the direction of departure and a ball showing the direction of approach. Additional information is usually added such as distance from the last junction, total distance from the start and relevant road sign/landmark information. Some events incorporate route checks, passage code boards to confirm that you have followed the correct route.

 

Equipment

A clipboard is advisable; pens and pencils to record possible route information and mark off road junctions in the road book; a trip meter, which is an instrument that accurately records distance. The latter usually has two displays, one for total mileage and one for interval distance. It will make reading the road book tulip diagrams easier but is not a necessity; a normal vehicle speedometers odometer will normally be accurate enough.

 

Time and Money

Most events are a one day format, but this is obviously dependent on where you live. The entry fee is dependent on what refreshments are being offered. They start from £45.

 

Event Information

The Historic Rally Car Register has for 2013 a list of events that they consider to be of an acceptable standard. They can be viewed at www.hrcr.co.uk. There are also a number of tours that are not on the list but are still very well run.

 

Authorisation

This is a topic in its own right and this is a very brief introduction, mainly for the benefit of clubs with no motor sport connections who may be in ignorance of the requirement. Running an unauthorised event may have implications in the areas of liability and insurance. It is a criminal offence to promote or take part in an unauthorised event, with the possibility of a fine of up to £1,000 (although not an area in which the police are particularly vigilant) and there is a possible liability of club officials.

 

Any event on the public roads in which more than 12 vehicles are required to follow a set route, whether there is any element of competition or not, is legally required to be authorised by the MSA. It is not necessary for the organiser to be an MSA recognised club for this purpose. MSA recognised clubs will in addition require either an MSA permit or a Certificate of Exemption depending on the type of event

 

The MSA as the agent of the DfT for authorising routes cannot distinguish between MSA recognised clubs and others, it must treat them on an even-handed basis.

 

Events with fewer than 12 cars:

The Regulations state that these are treated as authorised, nothing else is required.

 

Events with more than 12 cars - MSA recognised clubs:

The clubs are required to get a) route authorisation, as a legal requirement and b) a Certificate of Exemption (from permit) as an MSA requirement. They can do this online. The MSA carries insurance covering most of their activities.

 

Events with more than 12 cars - other clubs:

These clubs simply require route authorisation, as a legal requirement. They do not need a CoE because as they are not MSA clubs they do not require a permit anyway. They cannot apply for route authorisation online. They have to arrange all their own insurance.

The MSA website gives more information including the complete list of exempt events: www.msauk.com

 

FBHVC UPDATES January 2013

 

Historic Vehicle MoT Exemptions

The Statutory Instrument introducing the MoT exemption was published in October and came in to force on 18 November. SI 2012/2652 The Motor Vehicles (Tests) (Amendment) (No 2) Regulations 2012 simply adds pre-1960 vehicles to the list of other types of vehicle that do not require an MoT in order to be used on the road. We understand that a final decision about exemptions has not yet been made for Northern Ireland, which was the subject of a separate consultation.

 

The Road Traffic Act indicates that: the date of manufacture of a vehicle shall be taken to be the last day of the year during which its final assembly is completed except where after that day modifications are made to the vehicle before it is sold or supplied by retail and in that excepted case shall be taken to be the last day of the year during which the modifications are completed.

 

The Federation’s response to the original MoT consultation, backed up by the completion of the on-line survey, deliberately included the option of voluntary tests – something which had originally been opposed by DfT. The voluntary test will be the same as the statutory test with all the component and performance exemptions as allowed at present and there is thus no need to reinvent the wheel – the test is there and will remain in the VOSA manual. The vehicle testing station can log it onto the system and carry out the test as normal. As in any case where a vehicle fails its test, whether voluntary or mandatory, the keeper has a responsibility to ensure they do not use that vehicle on a public road as it is not in a roadworthy condition.

 

To enable members to find a suitable testing station the Federation has carried a list of garages known to be sympathetic to our vehicles on the website for some considerable time. There are approximately 400 testers listed, all recommended by historic vehicle owners.

 

The situation regarding those circumstances where an MoT was required, for example, as part of the V765 procedure, was clarified at a meeting with DVLA in Swansea in September. An MoT will not be required apart from for the cherished number transfer process, which is subject to a different regulation. DVLA have announced that form V112, Declaration of Exemption from MoT Testing, will be amended to add a new category ‘O’ to the list of exempt vehicles manufactured before 1 January 1960. This completed form will be required in place of the MoT certificate.

 

The Federation has suggested that it would be in the interests of safety to require an MoT for any vehicle that has been off road and/or subject to a SORN declaration for more than three years and is about to be used on the road again. This would prevent, for example, a vehicle that was taken off the road because of a previous MoT failure coming back into use with no checks on roadworthiness. We have not had an answer to this suggestion at the time of writing.

A footnote for owners of all vehicles irrespective of age: an MoT test certificate issued after 18 November 2012 will now show the vehicles recent mileage history. This has been introduced as part of a government initiative to reduce vehicle crime. Where available, the mileage history will comprise the readings associated with the three most recent VT20s (test passes) along with the dates of those readings. This will be in addition to the mileage recorded at the time of the current test.

 

EU PROPOSALS ON ROADWORTHINESS TESTING

 

As everyone is aware, the EU Commission has produced a draft Regulation (COM (2012) 380) on periodic roadworthiness tests for motor vehicles. There has been much comment in the media on the subject, not all of it well-balanced or accurate, and much based upon a misunderstanding of the workings of the EU. In fact, within the EU, the work of examining the draft is only really beginning now.

 

On 17 October, the House of Commons European Scrutiny Committee considered the implications of the proposal. The position of historic vehicles was not mentioned directly but the report of that meeting makes it clear that the UK government opposes the proposed Regulation on the fundamental grounds that it breaches EU ‘subsidiarity’ principles because it would place a significant financial and regulatory burden on Member States while doing little for road safety. Put simply, the UK government believes the proposal to be out of proportion.

 

The EU Council discussed the proposal on 29 October. It is clear from the press release on that debate that there are similar misgivings amongst many other EU Governments, in particular there was strong feeling that the legislation should be a Directive instead of a Regulation.  A Directive sets out general rules to be followed by each EU state legislating for the detail as it sees fit, whereas a Regulation sets out precise rules which have to be adopted exactly into the laws of EU States without amendment: it seems most Member States prefer an element of flexibility.  It must be understood that the purpose of that debate was to scope how the proposal goes into specialist preparatory bodies who will then argue out the details.  There is a long way to go before that task is complete.

 

So, at exactly the right time, FIVA, at its General Assembly on 27 October, considered the text of a paper to set out a consistent FIVA approach, in the form of a draft letter which the member Federations in the EU, including FBHVC, can submit at a suitable time to their respective Governments. The letter took account of the views of the FBHVC as expressed in a letter sent to FIVA prior to their meeting, especially as regards the difficulty of using the words ‘historically correct condition’ in a legal definition.

 

The primary points of the FIVA letter are as follows:

The letter supports the aim of excluding historic vehicles from the remit of any future pan-European testing regime, which will necessarily be adapted to the needs of modern, sophisticated, motor vehicles. The letter makes reference to the limited use and ownership by people whose understanding of their vehicles will in many cases be greater than that of the tester.

 

The letter supports the view that the proposed Regulation would be better and more workable as a Directive.

 

The letter agrees the use of a thirty year point at which a vehicle is to be regarded as historic.  It supports the principle that the testing of vehicles over this age should be the responsibility of individual Member States.

 

However, it strongly questions the further three parts of the proposed definition of a historic vehicle:

 

·                       that maintenance has to have been done using ‘replacement parts which reproduce’ the original components, on the grounds that over the years parts used may be different, and gives tyres, windscreen wipers and windows as specific examples;

 

·                       that the vehicle has not had any of its major components, such as engine, brakes, steering or suspension, changed, on the basis

o                                first, that very many historic vehicles have undergone such changes through their lives for reasons including the improvement of safety and road behaviour,

 

o                                and second, that the words ‘such as’ in the draft make the actual definition of these components unclear; and

 

·                       that the vehicle has not been changed in its appearance, on the basis that over the years very many historic vehicles have been re-bodied and altered, some as early as the 1920s and 1930s.

 

The letter argues that, whether the proposal is to remain a Regulation or to become a Directive, the test of whether a vehicle qualifies for special treatment should simply be a matter of age, and that questions of historic correctness should not come in to it.  The letter did, however, propose only minor changes to the recital in the preamble to the legislation (which is there to explain the reasoning behind the substantive clauses).  FIVA propose that this should now read as:

Recital (9): Vehicles of historic interest conserve heritage of the époque in which they were built, are maintained in a historically correct condition and are rarely used as everyday vehicles; it should be left to Member States to extend the period of periodic roadworthiness testing for such vehicles. It should also be for Member States to regulate roadworthiness testing of other types of specialised vehicles.

 

The FBHVC will now concentrate on taking this policy forward to the UK Government, including making sure they do fully address the detailed points we have raised in case the overall UK view, that any change to the roadworthiness testing regime is currently not justified, does not prevail.

It must be emphasises that the EU proposal is not to exempt historic vehicles from testing as such, but to allow Member States to decide if and how they wish to test such vehicles.  In UK, for instance, the government could expect vehicles over 30 years old to be tested on exactly the same basis as at present, but they would not have to demand that roadworthiness testing for historic vehicles should include checks against original specification.

 

DRIVER CERTIFICATE OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE (CPC) TRAINING

James Fairchild

 

Holders of bus and truck licences are reminded that time is running out for them to undertake Driver CPC training before the blue Driver Qualification Card becomes mandatory for all commercial carriage of passengers (from 8 September 2013) and commercial carriage of goods (from 8 September 2014). In this context ‘buses’ means anything from 9 seats upwards, and ‘goods’ anything over 3.5 tonnes.

 

It is important to note that Driver CPC may also apply to people who passed their car test before 1997 and use their C1 (7.5 tonne entitlement) or D1 (9-16 seat minibus entitlement) to drive commercially.

 

Many of the typical historic vehicle situations are covered by the exemption given on the DSA website: ‘You don’t need Driver CPC if the vehicle you drive is used for non-commercial carriage of passengers or goods for personal use’. This would seem to cover giving free historic bus rides around an event, or driving your own lorry with your newly acquired car project on the back.

 

GUIDANCE BOOKLET FOR CONVEYING HORSES, CARS ETC. ON THE BACK OF A GOODS VEHICLE, OR TOWING A TRAILER

James Fairchild

 

VOSA has produced an excellent guide aimed primarily at horseboxes (which it defines as both trailers towed by a car or 4x4, and lorries with horse accommodation) and their owners/drivers. In general, this guide is useful for our people who may wish to use trailers or lorries (of any age) to transport parts or vehicles. The horsebox guide covers all relevant areas including operator licences, types of driver licences and driver CPC (see elsewhere in this newsletter), MoTs, tachographs, speedlimiters, seatbelts and child seats.

A couple of points to add from the FBHVC Legislation Committee, more applicable to the carrying of cars:

 

·           There is a concession to allow the holder of a car licence (category B) who is aged at least 21 and held their full category B licence for two years to drive ‘Goods vehicles built before 1 January 1960, as long as they are not loaded and are not towing a loaded trailer’. In our opinion, a car or horse in the back would count as a load.

 

·           There is another concession around mobile project vehicles (where the vehicle can be any age) whereby the holder of a car licence (as above) can drive ‘A vehicle which has a Maximum Authorised Mass (MAM) exceeding 3.5 tonnes, whose primary purpose is to be used as a recreational, educational or instructional facility when stationary, carrying: (i) mainly goods or burden consisting of play or educational equipment and articles required in connection with the use of such equipment, or (ii) articles required for the purpose of display or of an exhibition’. If someone considers that this may apply to their proposed use, it is recommended that detailed advice is sought.

 

·           Rules around recovery of disabled vehicles are different (and for certain issues, more relaxed). However, these rules apply to the recovery of a disabled vehicle that has broken down in the purpose of making a legal journey on the highway only, and not (in our opinion) to the intentional towing of vehicles.

 

·           In recent years, products have been designed to allow small cars to be towed behind larger vehicles (motorhomes or vans) without needing a driver in the small car. We understand that such A-frame/small car combinations are likely to be considered a trailer, and so require trailer brakes and rear lights to function. Whether owners wish to look into ways to adapt the braking and lighting systems of their prized historic vehicle in order that this can be done is a matter for them, but we would advise that specialist advice be taken before commencing.

 

·           We also remind of the need to ensure that insurance covers the proposed use of the vehicle; in particular whether it allows trailers to be towed, or vehicles to be carried.

The horsebox guide can be found at: http://www.dft.gov.uk/vosa/repository/Horsebox%20Guide%20low%20res.pdf

 

FUEL NEWS

Matthew Vincent

 

The legislative process to permit the introduction of petrol containing up to 10% ethanol is expected to be completed by very late 2012 or early 2013. Once the enabling legislation is in place, the product, which will bear the name E10, may be sold at petrol stations, but unlike petrol containing 5% ethanol, which is already on sale, and which carries no label, E10 must be labelled. There has been recent publicity suggesting that there will be no introduction of the E10 petrol until 2014 or 2015. This may prove to be the case, and it would be situation which naturally the Federation would welcome. However, once the law permits the sale of this product, it must be recognised that it may appear in the market place. There may be retailers who wish to sell this fuel sooner rather than later. The Federation has been keen to ensure that when E10 petrol does

appear at the pumps, it can be easily recognised for what it is, enabling the historic vehicle owner to make an informed choice over whether or not to purchase the product.

 

The higher octane petrol blend usually known as Super Premium contains much reduced levels of ethanol as a general rule, so this may be worth considering for those owners of historic vehicles who are concerned about possible adverse effects from ethanol addition to normal 95 octane unleaded petrol. Oil industry sources indicate that the Super Premium product, which must by law provide an octane quality of 97, but which may in fact exceed 99 octane, is blended to meet these quality levels without the addition of ethanol. In many cases no ethanol is blended into this product after it is transported from the refinery, although this is not always the case, making it very difficult to be precise about ethanol contents. Oil company producers do not always have close control over distribution terminals which is where ethanol is blended into petrol before sale at garage forecourts. However, on balance, purchasing a Super Premium blend of unleaded petrol provides the opportunity to minimise ethanol content.

 

DVLA

Nigel Harrison

 

Notifying DVLA of year of manufacture

The subject of exemption from the MoT has been covered elsewhere in the newsletter. The following concerns the details relevant to the DVLA.

 

Where an owner believes that their vehicle should be exempt from the MoT due to the law change but the Vehicle Registration Certificate (V5C) does not reflect this they will need to write to DVLA to request a change. The address to write to is DVLA, Swansea, SA99 1BA.

 

In order to ensure the accuracy and integrity of the vehicle records held at the DVLA, it is important that evidence provided to amend or add information already held on the DVLA system is accurate and truly reflects the vehicle for which it is issued. Therefore it has been decided by DVLA, after discussions with the Federation that for these specific cases requests will only be considered when accompanied by either an extract from the manufacturer/factory record or an extract from the appropriate Glass’s Check Book. Both these documents will have a direct link to the chassis number that should already have been accepted and recorded on the vehicle record as part of the initial registration process.

 

DVLA will not accept general dating certificates as evidence to amend or update the date of manufacture. This is a change to what was mentioned in the last edition of the Newsletter, due to the nature of some of the notifications already received by DVLA. However, dating certificates will continue to be accepted for other purposes such as V765 claims and requests for age related numbers for recently restored or recently imported vehicles.

The appropriate specialist club will need to make the necessary checks to confirm that the physical vehicle is the same as on the V5C. This could well involve an inspection but in any case an overall photograph of the vehicle, detailed legible photograph of the chassis/frame number, and a copy of the vehicle details on the V5C would need to be seen. It could be anticipated that the chassis/frame number as recorded by DVLA might be missing certain prefixes or suffixes, as recorded on the physical vehicle, or there are minor long standing transcription errors. E.g. ‘ /’ rather than ‘1’, ‘B’ rather than ‘8’ etc. DVLA could well be already aware of these minor differences via the last MoT examiner. However, the core number should match or be contained in the number range of the legacy documentation.

 

In practical terms, I would anticipate that the named V765 scheme signatories for the specialist clubs as on the DVLA V765/1 List of Clubs, available from http://www.dft.gov.uk/dvla/forms or DVLA, will be able to assist owners in the location of the manufacturer/factory records if they still exist. Where this avenue draws a blank, I would anticipate that V765 scheme signatories will have their own copies of the appropriate Glass’s Check Book, be it the Car Check Book, the Commercial Vehicle Check Book (which includes car based commercials), or the Motor Cycle Check Book (which includes scooters, mopeds and three-wheelers).

If difficulties arise, the Federation is here to advise.

 

DIY Registration

Occasionally, an owner of an historic vehicle not already registered with DVLA attempts to do a DIY registration with DVLA. This is possibly because the owner is unaware that the registration process needs to be supported by a club on the DVLA V765/1 list of clubs.

 

If it is an application to reclaim an original registration number, the specialist unit at Swansea will simply return the application to the owner, also enclosing a list of clubs registered with DVLA, with the recommendation that the application needs to be supported by one of the those clubs. No harm done.

 

If the application is for an age-related number, this is dealt with by a DVLA Local Office. On one occasion, the owner did not have a dating letter from the appropriate specialist club, and the vehicle was incomplete and so not in a fit condition to be presented to DVLA. However, the DVLA Local Office then requested the owner to fill in a V627/1 form (Built up vehicle inspection report). As said in a previous edition of the Newsletter, this is not a form that should be used in conjunction with a Reconstructed Classic application.

 

The owner mentioned to DVLA that repair work had been done on the chassis, and this was mis-interpreted by DVLA as being a ‘cut and shut’ case. DVLA were proposing to allocate a Q plate to the vehicle.

The Federation is here for advice. In this case quite a bit of advice was required to get the application back on the age-related application road.

The registration of an historic vehicle is not a DIY activity, unless of course you want a Q plate. Please seek advice from the appropriate specialist vehicle club. If it is not clear which would be the most appropriate club, the Federation will be able to help.

EU LEGISLATION

 

European Commission proposes Regulation to amend existing Roadworthiness Testing Directive

Much has been written about this in this and the previous newsletter. The proposed Regulation is still a draft text - it can only be adopted with the support of the European Parliament and the Member State Governments (through the European Council). The European Parliament and the European Council will be scrutinising the draft Regulation over the coming months and will undoubtedly adopt amendments, among them the suggestion that this should be a Directive and not a Regulation, which will be included in the document when it is finally approved. FIVA will therefore communicate its views to MEPs and to each Member State Government with the objective that the two institutions together amend the Commission’s proposal so that the adopted Regulation presents no threat to FIVA’s members. FIVA will be seeking the support of the ANFs of Member States to communicate its view to both MEPs and national Governments.

FIVA communicates its position on Vehicle Registration to the European Parliament

In April the European Commission proposed a new vehicle registration Regulation designed to reduce the administrative burden caused by the need to re-register a vehicle if it/or the owner moves to another Member State.

FIVA has met with a representative of Mr. Manders (the MEP tasked with drafting the European Parliament position on the proposed Regulation) to:

·         note that some vehicles have no registration papers and that that some of these vehicles are on occasion sold within the EU;

·         call for the Regulation to acknowledge that in some Member States a system is in place to allow a vehicle without registration papers to be processed with relative ease – whereas in other cases, authorities are unwilling to seek resolution leading to vehicles not being able to be used either because they are not provided with new registration documents or because they are classified as ‘new’ and hence are unable to meet the safety and environmental conditions applied to modern vehicles; hence FIVA:

·         called for the Regulation to provide a steer to Member State authorities to help to ensure a consistent, efficient and effective approach to this matter; and suggested that:

·         the Regulation adopt a provision previously included in Commission Regulation No 183/2011 of 22 February 2011 amending Annexes IV and VI to Directive 2007/46/EC, Annex in Appendix 2, Point 0 which states that: ‘In the absence of a registration document, the competent authority may refer to available documented evidence of date of manufacture or documented evidence of first purchase’.

European Commission consultation on urban transport

The European Commission announced in September a public consultation on the future development of the EU's urban transport policy focusing on sustainable urban mobility plans, urban road user charging, and urban logistics. The initiative is a part of the Commission’s work which has already stated its objective that European cities should be free from petrol-fuelled cars by 2050. FIVA will contribute to the consultation which can be accessed at: http://ec.europa.eu/transport/urban/consultations/2012-12-10-urban-dimension_en.htm

A University study has questioned the benefits of Dutch LEZs

A study by the Dutch University of Utrecht has concluded that the introduction of low-emission zones (LEZs) in five Dutch cities has had no measurable effect on traffic-related pollution. The researchers measured air quality in eight streets in Amsterdam, The Hague, Utrecht, Tilburg and Den Bosch before LEZs were introduced in 2008 and again in 2010 and the measurements were also compared with readings taken from suburban pollution monitoring sites outside the zones. Overall, the study found changes in pollution inside LEZs were no different from changes outside the zones. The exception was a reduction in air pollution at one site in The Hague, which was attributed to a big fall in traffic volume and not just the LEZ. The authors have suggested that the small number of Lorries excluded from the zones and rising pollution from diesel cars could explain the findings.

FIVA GENERAL ASSEMBLY

The Fédération Internationale des Véhicules Anciens General Assembly occurs once a year and this year was held courtesy of the German motoring organisation, ADAC, over four days in late October in what became snowy, Munich. We thank ADAC, Daimler Benz and BMW for their hospitality.

The FBHVC is the British representative within FIVA. FIVA is a truly global organisation and represents not only our EU interests but counts significant input from the Historic Vehicle Association within North America and recent new members from countries such as Japan, Kuwait, Latvia, Malta and Thailand.

We are extremely fortunate to have significant representation within the FIVA Board and Commissions. At this year’s General Assembly, our chairman, David Whale, was elected Senior Vice President – Operations replacing our extremely long serving director Andrew Burt, who unfortunately had to resign on medical advice. We thank Andrew for his commitment to FIVA over many years and David hopes he may in some small part emulate what Andrew has achieved. Other board members are Tony Davies, director for Trade and Skills and Zoltán Gárdos who has recently re-located from Hungary and is the director for Membership Affairs. Our representation on the FIVA Commissions is significant too with David Hurley on Legislation, Colin Francis, Events; Paul Loveridge, Technical; Andy Steers, Motorcycles. David Whale’s former role within Culture is currently vacant.

TRADE AND SKILLS

Tony Davies

The responses to our 2012 web-based Trade and Skills Questionnaire for our club members during 2012 have been rather disappointing. To date (mid-October) the world-wide responses totalled around 2100 and Belgium tops the table with 500 responses, followed by Germany with 353 and Spain with 311. The UK is in fourth place with 274, ahead of Ireland with 173.

 

The UK really should be at the forefront of such initiatives so in an attempt to gather more opinions I am going to continue the process into 2013. However, with a new approach I shall open up the questionnaire to all historic vehicle enthusiasts in the UK via a QR Code etc. (shown below) in some of our national journals so please encourage your friends and colleagues to look out for it during 2013. Hopefully this approach will encourage more of our historic vehicle movement to express their concerns about the future.

 

Calling all classic vehicle enthusiasts - FBHVC and FIVA need you

The UK and World Federations for historic vehicles are addressing the issues of how the necessary technical knowledge to repair and restore classic vehicles can be retained for the future. To achieve this aim the FBHVC and FIVA with its 70 member countries are undertaking a large-scale survey of one of the key stakeholders, namely you the enthusiasts and owners of historic vehicles. The questionnaire, which can be completed via the internet, is completely anonymous as required and will be evaluated by FBHVC and FIVA.

 

The FBHVC and FIVA Working Groups invite all owners of classic cars, motorcycles, commercial and military vehicles etc. to take part in this survey. The questionnaire only takes a few minutes to complete and you will be helping to maintain your freedom to use yesterday’s vehicles on tomorrow’s roads. The findings will serve as a reference during many upcoming considerations and discussions to propose solutions for these issues. So please enter http://tinyurl.com/8cpqxvf on your browser and you will be automatically directed to the questionnaire.

 

As I’ve said many times before the key objectives of this questionnaire are to establish the personal opinions of you the historic vehicle enthusiasts on the availability, or otherwise, of relevant restoration skills. And, to further our cause, I shall be expanding our search for such information to the trade and professional service providers to establish their views on the subject. Small and very small enterprises are, I believe, the most under threat as the larger businesses can usually fend for themselves when times get difficult.

 

So please continue to express your views and encourage your club members to do likewise during 2013. It is becoming more important as we move forward as both Westminster and the EU are now taking more note of our work as a result of the 2011 FBHVC’s socio-economic survey, our meetings with the Department for Business Innovation and Skills and the trade and skills work I am undertaking for FIVA.

 

 

UPDATES October 2012

 

UK LEGISLATION

David Hurley

 

ROADWORTHINESS TESTING: NEW PROPOSAL FROM THE EU COMMISSION

When the European Parliament Historic Vehicle Group (EPHVG) met in May, Szabolcs Schmidt the head of the EC Road Safety Unit, mentioned that proposals for revisions to the Roadworthiness Testing Directive, following a 2010 consultation, were expected ‘in the summer’. In July, the European Commission published the detail which turned out to be a proposal to replace the current Roadworthiness Testing Directive (2009/40/EC) with a completely new Regulation.

 

The difference between a Directive and a Regulation is that each Member State must adopt a national law to implement a Directive while a Regulation is binding in its entirety and directly applicable in all Member States.

 

It was unfortunate that the editorial deadline for the August newsletter closed on 9 July and this important item was issued four days later. Subsequently the Department for Transport issued a ‘Request for information circular’ to assist them in negotiations with the Commission. On such an important matter we decided to issue a press release on 23 August to make our views widely known and included on the mailing list were all the member clubs for whom we have email addresses as well as our press database.

 

The draft of the new Regulation has implications for all motorists, not just historic vehicle owners. Amongst other things, the draft includes requirements to test all trailers (which in turn implies a registration system) and requires tests to make reference to a vehicle’s original ‘technical characteristics’. The meaning of this expression is not defined. National governments are granted the right to make their own testing arrangements for ‘vehicles of historic interest’. A vehicle of historic interest is then defined as one that

· Was manufactured more than 30 years ago

· Is maintained by use of replacement parts which reproduce the historic components of the vehicle

· Has not sustained any change in the technical characteristics of its main components such as engine, brakes, steering or suspension; and

· Has not been changed in its appearance.

 

FBHVC considers this definition to be unworkable and completely unacceptable. FBHVC also rejects the suggestion that Roadworthiness Testing should relate to a vehicle’s ‘technical characteristics’, whatever the age of the vehicle. Modifications, alterations and improvements are all part of the history of motor vehicles and the older the vehicle, the more likely it is that it will have been altered at some stage. At present the basic tenet of a UK MoT test is that it is one of mechanical fitness. There is no database of original specifications for UK vehicles, so testing to original 'technical characteristics' is simply pie-in-the-sky.

 

Earlier this month, the Department for Transport asked stakeholders for comment on the proposals. FBHVC will be responding formally to this request when further analysis of the detailed proposals has been completed. FBHVC will be discussing the implications of the proposal with the international organisation, FIVA, and through them with the EPHVG group as well as with the All Party Parliamentary Historic Vehicle Group in the UK.

 

It should be remembered that this is still just a proposal. It has to have approval by each EU member country before it is adopted. Some media commentary on this topic has tended towards the ‘we’re doomed’ end of the scale. It is certainly a serious issue and FBHVC is treating it accordingly.

 

Since the above was circulated the Federation has formally replied to DfT’s information request within the short deadline allowed. We pointed out that the proposed definition of a ‘vehicle of historic interest’ is unworkable, explained why, and offered a suggestion for a simpler two-stage definition of a vehicle of historic interest that would not change the status of any vehicle considered historic under the current Roadworthiness Testing Directive. We also pointed out that testing of trailers would require the establishment of costly registration and testing systems for little road safety benefit (it is understood that most trailer related accidents occur as a result of tyre failure) and objected to the notion, inherent in the proposal, that conformity to original technical characteristics has any bearing on roadworthiness.

 

We anticipate a continuing dialogue with DfT as the EU debate continues. Certainly the FIVA Legislation Commission (of which I am a member) is unhappy with the restricted nature of the definition of a ‘vehicle of historic interest’ contained in the draft.

 

UK MOT EXEMPTIONS

As recorded previously, on 18 November 2012 vehicles manufactured before 1 January 1960 will become exempt from the MoT test. This exemption is permitted under Article 4 of the current Roadworthiness Testing Directive (2009/40/EC), and was decided before the proposal described above was published. There are a number of circumstances where, at present, an MoT is required, for example, as part of the V765 procedure, but it has still not been made clear by DfT what the new rules will be, despite repeated approaches by the Federation. The Federation has called for an urgent meeting with the DVLA on September 19 to seek clarification on all such points from the key policy maker, who will also be attending the meeting.

 

We have received a number of queries about voluntary MoTs and the possibility of setting up a ‘roadworthiness test’ for pre-1960 vehicles. Our response to the original MoT consultation, backed up by the completion of the on-line survey, deliberately included the option of voluntary tests – something which had originally been opposed by DfT. The voluntary test is likely to be the same as the statutory test with all the component and performance exemptions as allowed at present and there is thus no need to reinvent the wheel – the test is there and will remain in the VOSA manual.

 

To enable members to find a suitable testing station the Federation has carried a list of garages known to be sympathetic to our vehicles on the website for some considerable time. There are approximately 400 testers listed, all recommended by historic vehicle owners.

 

TAXI AND PRIVATE HIRE SERVICES

The Law Commission consultation concerning consolidation of control of taxi and private hire vehicles was covered in depth in our last newsletter. The Federation has made a formal response to the Law Commission which included our view that the traditional use of historic vehicles for weddings should be able to continue unfettered by bureaucracy. It should be remembered that before any enactment can take place, DFT will have to undertake a further formal consultation exercise.

 

IMPLEMENTATION OF THIRD DRIVING LICENCE DIRECTIVE

There are new age restrictions coming into force on 19 January 2013 which apply to driving licences. If a driving licence is currently held, the existing entitlements to drive the different types of vehicles shown on the driving licence remain. However where the licence holder wishes to drive or pass a test for additional vehicles on or after 19 January 2013, the new rules will apply.

 

The main changes are:

·      Category D – Any bus designed and constructed for the carriage of more than 8 passengers in addition to the driver, with a trailer up to 750kg, and

·      Category DE – As above, but with a trailer other 750kg

 

The minimum age is increasing from 21 to 24, although the lower age limits of 17 (Armed Forces) and 18 (PCV/CPC) remain.

 

The EU have allowed the UK to continue long-standing practices of the use of normal Class B (car) licences for some steam and private preserved buses over 30 years old (with the existing conditions of use).

 

There are 3 new categories:

·      Category A2 - A motorcycle of a power not exceeding 35kW, with a power to weight ratio not exceeding 0.2kW per kg and not being derived from a vehicle of more than double its power – minimum age 19.

 

·      Category AM – two or three-wheeled vehicles with a maximum design speed of not more than 45km/h or a light quadricycle with an unladen mass of not more than 350kg, not including the mass of the batteries in case of electric vehicles, whose maximum design speed is not more than 45km/h – minimum age 16.

 

·      Category Q - Motor vehicles with less than four wheels which are propelled by an internal combustion engine, has a cylinder capacity not exceeding 50cc and, if not equipped with pedals by means of which the vehicle is capable of being propelled, has a maximum design speed not exceeding 25km/h – minimum age 16.

 

The full list of licence categories runs to many pages and can be found on the DVLA website: www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/DriverLicensing/DG_201206

 

 

FUEL NEWS

INTRODUCTION OF E10 PETROL

The FBHVC and member clubs have previously been led to believe that the widespread introduction of E10 fuel was unlikely before 2015. However, following a recent Stakeholder meeting at the Department for Transport it does seem that this has changed and E10 could be with us as early as 2013.

 

The BSI committee (the Federation has a representative on this committee) is working on the E10 fuel specification for the UK which is expected to be in place by the end of 2012 and fuel retailers are to be given guidance over the introduction of E10 petrol. There is currently no planned national roll-out for E10 and not all fuel terminals have ethanol blending facilities, so a piecemeal introduction of E10 can be expected.

 

A DfT vehicle compatibility working group will be compiling a list of modern E10 compatible vehicles and this should be in place by early September. There is also a working group subset which is concerned with classic or historic vehicles, including motorcycles, to which the Federation is invited.

 

We are already well aware that E10 is not suitable for historic vehicles, unless steps have been taken to proof fuel systems for this blend. Members should be aware that E10 may start to penetrate the UK retail fuel market early in 2013, and they should avoid it unless they have adopted measures to ensure compatibility with E10 petrol. Pumps selling this fuel will be clearly labelled E10, and also will carry a warning message. It should also be noted that super grade petrol will continue to be the ‘protection grade’ and will not have more than 5% ethanol.

 

LEADED PETROL

A list of garages selling leaded fuel can found on the FBHVC website: www.fbhvc.co.uk/fuel-information/ This list has recently been updated and there are now very few places left to fill up with leaded petrol. The list is laid out in post code order.

 

Dawson Engineering (Burley) Ltd   BH24 4EB  01425 402388

Maple Garage                                   HU11 4NA 01964 670392

Redhall Garage Ltd                          LE67 8HG  01530 222323

R E Mills Motor Engineers             LE7 7NU    0116 230 2295

Renlut Properties Limited                LL12 8DY  01978 352428

Stoke Row Garage                           RG9 5QL    01491 680411

Park End Motor & Engineering Co. Ltd            SE13 6TR  020 8697 2865

Platts of Marlow                               SL7 2NJ     01628 890909

H J Taylor                                         WR12 7PL 01386 852338

 

 

 

DVLA

Nigel Harrison

 

New MOT exemption threshold

As has been already reported, from 18 November vehicles manufactured prior to 1 January 1960 will be exempt from the MoT.

 

For a proportion of historic vehicles DVLA don’t have a record of the year of manufacture. This is typically because the source of the information was the RF60/VE60 old style logbook, handed in during the tax renewal process in the 1970s. The year of manufacture was not recorded on that document, so could not be transposed to the DVLA computer record. These days when an historic vehicle is registered, the year of manufacture is also recorded, typically from a V55/5 form and the sponsoring clubs dating letter or V765 form.

 

Although some historic vehicles don’t have a date of manufacture recorded, all vehicles will have a date of registration. To illustrate how DVLA cope with the situation where legislation relates to the date of manufacture and DVLA only have the registration date, it will be helpful to look at the taxation class for historic vehicles. Historic vehicles are exempt from vehicle excise duty if they were manufactured before 1 January 1973. DVLA state that provided a vehicle ‘was registered from 1/1/1973 up to and including 7/1/1973, we [DVLA] will let you register it as an historic vehicle, based on the assumption that the vehicle would have been made in the previous year’. (DVLA leaflet INF34.) If DVLA follow the same logic with the pre-1960 MoT threshold, vehicles registered on or before 7 January 1960 will be exempt from an MoT.

 

There will be a small proportion of vehicles manufactured before the end of 1959 but registered after 7 January 1960 where DVLA don’t have a year of manufacture recorded, and examples would include second-hand imported vehicles, and vehicles disposed of by the military.

 

Sometimes it is not clear from the V5C if DVLA do have a record of the year of manufacture. One source of information is via the RAC website: www.rac.co.uk. Scroll down to ‘Other Services’, and click on ‘Car Checks’. On the ‘Car Data Check’ page, it infers that there is a charge for checking a vehicle record, however, there is no charge for just the display of the basic ‘vehicle details’, which is a copy of DVLA data.

 

As an example, using one of my own vehicles, input the registration number 748 UPF and click on ‘Buy Now’. A page will be displayed headed ‘Vehicle Check’. In this example, there is no value against year of manufacture, so DVLA have not recorded the data.

 

There is also vehicle information on the DirectGov web site at www.taxdisc.direct.gov.uk, which can sometimes be misleading. If DVLA don’t have a declared value for the year of manufacture, for some vehicle records, there is an entry generated and displayed for the year of manufacture. Sometimes, although not in this case, it can be incorrect.

 

If your vehicle was registered after 7 January 1960, but made before 1960, and there is not a year of manufacture recorded (as indicated on the RAC website), for the vehicle to be exempt from the MoT, DVLA will need to be notified of the correct date. The appropriate specialist vehicle club should be able to produce the necessary dating letter, once they have carried out the necessary checks, which could well involve an inspection, and a fee for the dating letter.

 

Vehicles most likely to be affected by this missing data are ex-military vehicles under 3500 kg GVW, and second hand imported vehicles, first registered by local registration authorities in the 1960s or 1970s, but manufactured in the 1940s or 1950s.

 

 

 August 2012

HISTORIC VEHICLE MOT EXEMPTION REVIEW

A fuller breakdown of the review responses than that contained in the original Department for Transport announcement is shown below. I acknowledge the assistance of Jeaur Rahman of the DfT who gave me additional figures to improve clarity.

 

Total Responses

447 

Those in support

Those against

General public (including MPs

335

262

73

Representative and interest groups

36

24

12

Declared historic vehicle owners

32

14

18

Small and medium enterprises

23

11 

12

Large companies

4

5

Other (museums, collectors, clubs,

suppliers, workshops, charities

12

10

2

 

Of those responses that agreed with a review: total 325 (73%)

262 agreed with option 1 (up to 1960)

16 agreed with option 2 (up to 1945)

24 with option 3 (up to 1920)

23 preferred alternative options (not offered)

 

Responses against a review: total 122 (27%)

It is appropriate to point out that even if the respondent represents the views of many, it is not weighted in any analysis. It is unfortunate that a couple of classic motoring publications misread the figures (and text) issued by DfT in their copy (not assisted by a mix of numbers and percentages in the source document). One weekly transcribed ‘general public’ as ‘general managers of the public’ as well as saying that 56% of respondents were against the review, compounding this by implying that 81%, 5% and 8% of responses favoured options 1, 2, and 3 whereas these percentages relate only to those who were in favour of a review.

I fully accept that journalists can put an opposing view on any subject, but to publish the content of an important Government document in an incorrect manner misleads their readership.

 

Broadly the figures show the same attitude as the FBHVC on-line survey, even though the number of responses to the DfT consultation was much smaller.

 

Voluntary Tests

The original consultation ruled out voluntary tests. However, as a result of pressure, the DfT and the Minister agreed that this facility would be made available as part of the implementation process. A number of clubs and individuals have been anxious to learn more details about this new concept. The short answer is that, following the Ministerial announcement, in principle DfT and VOSA will be involved in changing legislation and procedures to allow for this facility before the November deadline. Whilst the internal discussions take place no formal details in black and white can be issued by either DfT or VOSA. However ‘reliable sources’ would suggest that the voluntary test is likely to be the same as the statutory test with all the component and performance exemptions as allowed at present. In the UK the testing regime operated by VOSA has always been age related and is a common sense approach.

 

What actual paperwork is to be issued after the test is yet to be decided. Certainly it is envisaged that all VOSA approved stations, whether private or VOSA run, will participate.

 

Please allow both bodies to work through the processes required, rather than get interrupted by having to stop and reply to questions that are unanswerable at this moment in time – the movement needs a good on-going relationship with both departments.

 

The limited time scale allowed before implementation would not allow for a parallel test regime for historic vehicles to be introduced as has been suggested by some respondents. Ignoring the enormous effort in drafting six new testing manuals from scratch there are greater system problems and costs which for a limited number of tests in each class each year could not be justified. Many of the problems experienced in the past are down to lack of knowledge of individual testers. In this connection the FBHVC already publishes a list of 400 test stations on our website that are recommended by enthusiast users. The existing test regime properly conducted is still appropriate.

 

Historic vehicle owners remain responsible for the safe mechanical condition of their vehicles, and a prudent owner who ‘self maintains’ should perhaps consider a voluntary test as part of their husbandry regime.

 

As soon as more details are known the FBHVC will of course keep you informed.

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

FUEL NEWS

 

At the end of June the FBHVC’s fuel specialist, Matthew Vincent attended a meeting at the British Standards Institute to discuss petrol labelling. There were a number of points of particular interest to member organisations. 

The proposed volatility limits of petrol containing 10% ethanol (E10) in the revised European specification are likely to be agreed later this year. The inclusion of 10% ethanol will be accompanied by an increase in the permitted upper limit of volatility. Although the change is small, in effect it means that petrol with 10% ethanol will be more volatile than existing petrol containing no ethanol, or with 5% ethanol in blend. This change will not assist owners of historic vehicles fitted with carburettors, but there has already been significant discussion about in-situ alterations for vehicles suffering from vapour lock in hot weather. The arrival of E10 will probably require a renewal of awareness of these remedies. Full details about this are already on the FBHVC website. 

E10 can be sold in the UK as soon as the documentary work has been completed. It is expected that this will be achieved late in 2012, so in theory the product could be in the market from the first quarter of 2013. Exactly how much of this grade arrives, and when, is not known yet, and this situation appears to contradict statements made by the Department for Transport earlier this year at the clubs’ meeting.  DfT are expected to publish a leaflet explaining what will be happening. It was the belief of those assembled that petrol containing 5% ethanol would be retained until 2020, but it was also clear that over time ethanol levels would rise above 10% in order to meet EU legislation on renewable fuels. It is envisaged that high octane unleaded petrol (sometimes called ‘super premium’ and usually of 97-99 octane rating) would not contain more than 5% ethanol, and would remain as a protection grade for the foreseeable future. 

The labelling for E10 was discussed in detail and it was agreed that the code ‘E10’ would feature prominently on the label, being given the same size lettering (15mm) as the words ‘Unleaded Petrol’ and the octane rating (95).  The warning to motorists about the suitability or otherwise of the fuel will use smaller lettering (10mm), but should still be clearly visible. Despite apparent agreement at a previous meeting of a different format, the form of wording shown below was adopted: ‘Not suitable for all vehicles. Consult vehicle manufacturer before use’. 

This might in theory cause some logistical problems for owners of historic vehicles whose manufacturers no longer exist, but in reality, unless actions are taken by owners to proof their fuel systems against the effects of E10, it should be regarded as unsuitable for any historic vehicle. 

Unleaded petrol containing up to 5% ethanol will not need to be labelled, but if the ethanol content rises above 5%, the fuel must be labelled. If the label on the petrol pump does not include the code ‘E10’, then the fuel should contain no more than 5% ethanol. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

FBHVC FUEL UPDATE May 2012

 

TARGETED CONSULTATION ON PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE BIOFUEL (LABELLING) REGULATIONS 2004

The DfT response to this consultation, which closed in October 2011, has now been published. The document says:

We proposed to implement article 21 of the RED by amending the Biofuel (Labeling) Regulations 2004 (as amended) to introduce a labeling requirement for biofuels containing over 10% biofuel.

Consultation responses have raised genuine concerns regarding how useful the new biofuel label would be to consumers. In addition, similar labeling is already taking place as a result of existing domestic legislation and industry self-regulation.

After careful consideration and taking into account comments received during consultation, we have decided we do not need to legislate further to give full effect to article 21(1) of the RED. As such we will not introduce the draft regulations proposed in our consultation.

 

The Department for Transport has indicated that UK targets for biofuel uptake are set at 5% for the 2013/14 financial year as an average across all petrol and diesel. It is believed that the oil industry has no plans to introduce petrol containing 10% ethanol before this date. Most 95 octane petrol sold in the UK now contains 5% ethanol by volume, but at this concentration, there is no requirement to display a label advertising its ethanol content. The requirement for labeling only exists if ethanol content rises above 5%.

 

The issue of pump labeling is currently under discussion, and will be the responsibility of the British Standards Institute. The time-frame for the arrival of petrol containing 10% ethanol looks to be about 2 years in the future, so discussions are in their early days. However, it is believed that there are two key issues which will apply to pump labels:

 

·       A desire for harmonisation across Europe (petrol containing ethanol at 10% may be designated E10, for example), as in some continental European countries.

·       The inclusion of a statement about the suitability of the fuel for road vehicles. One option being considered is the use of a list indicating models which manufacturers have stated are compatible with the fuel. Vehicles not on the list would be regarded as not compatible. This category would include almost all, if not all, historic vehicles, (unless their owners had taken steps to ensure compatibility).

 

These topics are currently under consideration, and it is expected that a clearer picture will emerge later in the year, when definitive proposals come up for discussion.

 

The Department for Transport invited FBHVC member clubs to a Fuel Stakeholder meeting on 17 February 2012 to discuss ethanol in petrol. The meeting was well attended by FBHVC club representatives. In addition to three members of the Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs legislation committee, two of whom were representing Riley Register and Vincent motorcycles respectively, representatives for Jaguar, Sunbeam, Morgan, Bristol, Triumph, MG, military vehicles and the VSCC were present. The AA was also represented, and the meeting was well attended by oil company representatives who were generally helpful and sympathetic. DfT will issue formal minutes to all representatives, and will also arrange for the exchange or representatives’ email addresses.

One of the key messages which DfT were keen to put across was that E10 is not mandated for introduction in 2013. It was widely believed that E10 would be a reality in 2013, but this was stated to be an error or myth. It is now believed that E10 introduction is more likely from 2014. Some 4 million vehicles in the UK vehicle parc are currently not compatible with E10.

It emerged that much, but not all, super premium petrol (i.e. octane quality of 97(RON) or above) does not contain ethanol. However, it is not always easy to know exactly which forecourts are selling ethanol-free super premium, and which are selling this grade with some added ethanol. This grade still represents the best chance of minimising or avoiding ethanol, albeit with a cost penalty.

The FBHVC are looking into the suggestion the Federation should collaborate with the oil industry to try to establish a more detailed and accurate picture of where ethanol-free super-premium petrol could be obtained for those interested in buying it. This will only be a temporary respite as it is clear that ethanol is not going to go away, and that a sensible strategy is to learn to live with it. The three-pronged approach advocated by the Federation:

Compatibility: move progressively to the use of compatible materials as this becomes necessary.

Corrosion: employ a proven corrosion inhibitor in the fuel tank as a precautionary measure.

Combustion: adjust mixture strength to counteract the leaning effect of ethanol in the blend and re-route fuel feed lines and/or employ baffles or other thermal barrier devices to reduce heat transfer from the engine to the liquid side of the fuel metering system on the vehicle remains a valid and common-sense approach to the potential problems of the use of fuels containing ethanol.

The Federation would also like to emphasise that it does not recommend the use of kerosene in those engines that have not been specifically designed to use it.

As reported in the last FBHVC newsletter, the international organisation, FIVA, has submitted views to the European Commission on a consultation on the future infrastructure requirement to ensure the increased use of alternative fuels in the EU. The submission stated FIVA’s view that both traditional fuels and E5 must remain available on the market to ensure the continued use of historic vehicles because experience has also shown significant technical problems for historic vehicles by the use of E10 - with vehicles most likely to be affected being vehicles ten years old or older, carburettored vehicles and first generation direct spark ignition vehicles.

 

For more detailed information please see the bio-fuel page www.fbhvc.co.uk/bio-fuels

November 2011

 

‘The End of Life Vehicles Regulations 2003 implemented the requirement of the EU End of Life Vehicles Directive (2000/53).

 

The law states that all End of Life Vehicles must be taken to an Authorised Treatment Facility (ATF) to be destroyed and de-polluted in an environmentally friendly way. The ATF will notify DVLA that the vehicle has been destroyed and issue the person presenting the vehicle for scrapping will be issued with a Certificate of Destruction (CoD) which closes down the vehicle record at DVLA and ends the registered keepers' responsibility for the vehicle.

 

Because of this, vehicle keepers cannot "scrap" a vehicle themselves and so DVLA no longer accepts notifications of scrapping made on the V5C.

The removal of the scrap box on the new V5C was in accordance to the End of Life Vehicle Directive requirement, in that all vehicles must be taken to an ATF to be destroyed and issued with a CoD.

 

Over recent years the salvage industry has campaigned for the removal of the scrap box on the V5C. DVLA realised that the scrap box should be removed at the earliest convenience, and was therefore removed during the wider review of other changes needed to the certificate and was incorporated with the re-design of the V5C.’

 

‘With regards to the points made in your consultation response regarding the difficulty historic vehicle enthusiasts find in notifying DVLA. I hope you find the following helpful.’

 

For vehicles outside the scope of the ELV requirement, such as historic vehicles, the V5C can still be used. If parts are delivered to an Authorised Treatment Facility (ATF) then the V5C/3 ‘selling or transferring your vehicle to a motor trader, insurer or dismantler’ part of the V5C should be filled in with the ATF’s details and sent to DVLA. Alternatively, if the ATF is reluctant to fill in the V5C/3 or a keeper is self scrapping, then the whole V5C can be sent to DVLA with a covering explanation letter, dated and signed. Within 4 weeks DVLA should confirm receipt that the person is no longer the keeper of the vehicle and this discharges the requirement to tax or SORN each year.’

 

E-petition to restore a rolling 30 year old exemption to VED

On the face of it, this is an understandable move to eradicate the invidious gap between the VED treatment of pre-1973 vehicles and more modern classics, caused by the actions of Gordon Brown who, when Chancellor, stopped the rolling nature of the Historic VED category. The FBHVC have consistently asked for reinstatement on a thirty year basis (originally it was 25 years) but whilst Labour were in power it proved impossible.

 

Prior to the election last year the Conservatives acknowledged the anomaly and agreed to review it if they gained power, while warning that it would probably need to be fiscally neutral. (That’s before they opened the books!) The political climate (Coalition) and economic situation have deteriorated dramatically since the change of government. With the programme of deficit reduction adversely affecting government spending, including that for vulnerable sections of society, it is, in my personal view, the wrong time to raise the profile of this anomaly and could prejudice any future change for many years.

 

The theory behind e-petitions is that if the petition gets 100,000 signatures, and gets the support of the Backbenchers’ Committee, it will be debated in the Commons. It is inevitable that the coalition would be against change at this juncture since it cuts across the main government policy and would give away revenue to a minority interest. You can also imagine the reaction of the opposition; it would be perceived as giving away revenue to ‘Hooray Henrys’ in their expensive classics whilst at the same time cuts to expenditure on the NHS, Social Services, concessionary fares for OAPs and libraries continue. Issues raised in any debate would leave a lasting bad feeling against our movement and make it politically impossible to change the concession for many years. It is also possible that some opposition members might question the continuing existing concession. It is vitally important to retain public and political support for our movement and to avoid any accusations of being a blinkered self-interested minority. Adverse press coverage would be inevitable.

The FBHVC board will debate the merits of this petition at its next meeting on 21 September and no doubt it will also be a topic for discussion during the AGM.

 

ORIGINAL NUMBER CLAIMS (V765 SCHEME)

The identity of a vehicle starts with the chassis, or monocoque. The V765/3 Scheme Guidance Notes indicates that: ‘you must be satisfied that the vehicle is genuine’, and: ‘you must be satisfied that the evidence linking the vehicle with the number is genuine’. Should the criteria contained in INF26 (Guidelines on how you can register kitcars and rebuilt or radically altered vehicles) Section 2, called ‘Vehicles that have been rebuilt using a mixture of new/used parts’ also be applied?

 

The reply from DVLA was:

‘The INF 26 procedures are in place purely to assess the identity of vehicles which are currently registered on DVLA’s system.

 

‘The V765 scheme is intended to ensure that the vehicle being registered for the first time on DVLA’s computerised system is reunited with its original identity. If, prior to applying via the V765 scheme, a historic or classic vehicle is rebuilt (rather than repaired) from parts taken from a number of donor vehicles, or where the donor vehicle may not be known, the correct course for registration would be the Reconstructed Classic route – providing the criteria are met. However, DVLA relies on the integrity and expertise of the owners club to ensure that the vehicle being registered is what it purports to be. Whether the clubs apply the INF26 principles as a guide is a matter for them.’

 

In practical terms, I would suggest that using the principles in Section 2 of INF26 does have a lot of merit. In particular for a chassis-based vehicle, the body does not come into the jigsaw.

 

There was concern expressed at the clubs’ meeting held in March at DVLA’s Theale office about owners who change the body type prior to a claim for that particular number. Provided that the chassis and mechanical components come from the same vehicle that used to display the registration number, the new type of body should not adversely affect your judgement on that claim.

 

In an ideal world the pre-1982 documentary evidence which links the vehicle to the registration number would also contain the model and chassis number. Where no chassis number is shown is it reasonably likely that these documents could relate to the physical vehicle? DVLA will take into account your decisive recommendation when deciding whether to allocate the number to the vehicle on a non-transferable basis.

 

SORNING REMNANTS OF VEHICLES

This is a question relating to vehicles used exclusively for historic track racing events. It is not unusual to have an historic racing vehicle paired with a second donor vehicle used for spares. It is accepted that the main vehicle needs to be SORNed. As the donor vehicle is used up, when does it technically no longer exist and so does not need to be SORNed?

 

DVLA have indicated the following:

If you still have the key remnants of the vehicle, e.g. the chassis or bodyshell, and two other major components e.g. front and back suspension, both axles, transmission, steering assembly, or engine, you will need to keep declaring SORN.

 

A vehicle keeper must notify DVLA immediately if they rebuild or modify their vehicle. In cases where a registered vehicle is rebuilt or modified from its original specification it will be assessed under the INF26 guidelines and a physical inspection of the vehicle by a DVLA local office will be required.

 

If a vehicle is rebuilt using a second hand chassis or monocoque bodyshell from a donor vehicle or from an unknown source, the identity will change irrespective of how many components are retained from the original vehicle and it is advisable for anyone intending to carry out such a build to familiarise themselves with the INF26 before work begins.

 

In the scenario described, where a car is used for off road race or speed events, and is repaired/rebuilt from parts of another registered and SORNed vehicle, SORN must be declared on both vehicles and must continue to be until the vehicles are destroyed. Such vehicles should not be relicensed for use on the public road until DVLA has been notified of the rebuild/modifications.

 

REINCARNATED VEHICLES

Vehicles that have been driven by a well-known personality, or have won a number of races are typically recognised by their registration numbers and/or chassis numbers. The value of these vehicles can be on the high side. However, some of these vehicles that were written off in severe crashes subsequent to their moments of fame are occasionally ‘found’ again in a remarkably intact condition. I would expect that the majority of specialist clubs will be wary of these ‘found’, formally written off vehicles, and would treat any claim for that number in the appropriate manner. Possibly an age-related number application could be more appropriate.

 

If specialist clubs come across cases like this, it would be helpful if they could send in the V765 form to DVLA, with the rejection box ticked, together with an explanation on how this conclusion was deduced. This could prevent DVLA accepting a later recommendation for this number from a non-specialist club, who may not be quite so knowledgeable.

 

The Federation is keen to maintain the reputation of the V765 scheme. If a club is aware of any such vehicles they may wish to pass this information on to the Federation, together with some background information. The Federation will then pass this information onto the appropriate section at DVLA.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Two Irishmen flew to Canada on a hunting trip. They chartered a small plane to take them into the Rockies for a week hunting moose.

They managed to bag 6. As they were loading the plane to return, the

Pilot said the plane could take only 4 moose.

The two lads objected strongly. "Last year we shot six. The pilot let us take them all and he had the same plane as yours."

Reluctantly, the pilot gave in and all six were loaded. The plane took off.

However, while attempting to cross some mountains even on full power

The little plane couldn't handle the load and went down.

Somehow, surrounded by the moose bodies, only Paddy and Mick survived the crash.

After climbing out of the wreckage, Paddy asked Mick, "Any idea where we are?"

Mick replied, "I think we're pretty close to where we crashed last year.

SHVR magazine January 2011

 

FBHVC NEWS

 

RESEARCH ACTION NEEDED!

 

Yes, it’s survey time again and FBHVC needs all clubs to encourage their members to take part by maximising publicity about what FBHVC is doing, and why.

 

Nothing captures politicians’ attention more effectively than big, or valuable, numbers. To be effective in its work, FBHVC must have up-to-date facts and figures about all aspects of the historic vehicle movement. These include the numbers of people and vehicles involved as well as the movement’s economic value.

The last set of such data is now five years old and needs to be brought up to date to meet the challenges of the next few years. FBHVC is thus embarking on a new survey of the movement in May.

 

In 2006, clubs were asked to distribute paper questionnaires. This time it’s easier - the survey is on-line, but this will only work if clubs encourage their members to take part. The panel below contains some suggested text - please use this on websites and in all publications being sent out between now and July.

 

Separate questionnaires will be sent to traders, club secretaries and museums during April.

 

The results will be analysed during the summer, and results should be published in November.

 

SHVR members who have access to online facilities are urged to fill in the online survey in an attempt to protect our hobby.

 

FIVA are proposing a globally-accepted definition of an historic vehicle. The results of this proposal could make the UK classic car fraternity worse off as it specifically excludes classics used for daily transport. Plus you will have to pay €25 for a FIVA ID card (valid for ten years)

 

FBHVC/DVLA NEWS

 

Owners of classic and historic cars will shortly be able to notify the DVLA to make the number plate on their car ‘non-transferable’ through a simple request process.

 This action from the DVLA is in response to a request from the Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs to make this facility available to owners, to quell the rising tide of dissent regarding classics being parted from their original registration numbers.

 The FBHVC asked the ministry to consider owners being able to request non-transferability, rather than a mandatory requirement. This should ensure that future generations researching the history of these cars have the ability to understand the difference between geniune issued plates and age-related numbers.

 John Vale, from the DVLA’s Corporate Affairs Directorate explained that ‘owners will be able to make an irrevocable correction to the official record, so that the mark can never be transferred off the vehicle or ever be removed from it in the future.’

 This change should pacify owners who are concerned that at some future point, the cars they love are separated from their original registration number so that dealers and private individuals can maximise profit from a car.

 A recent survey of Ford owners from the Ford Y and C Register confirmed that 50 percent were  in favour of a voluntary scheme and 25 percent wanted original number plates to be compulsorily retained to the original vehicle.

 A vehicle which had no V60 and no log book that had the number re-united would be non-transferable anyway. Only being on the 1983 register ( held by DVLA) confirs tranferability.

 

 

UK LEGISLATION

David Hurley

It has been a much quieter time for us of late with no outstanding consultations for us to answer.

 

Motor Fuel Regulations

There has been no feedback on this closed, then re-opened, and then closed again consultation as yet. We understand that a report from a consultant has been submitted to DfT and should be published on their website by the end of November. We do have some news on bio-fuels, particularly relating to motorcyclists, elsewhere in this newsletter however.

 

Historic vehicles and MoT testing stations

Following many comments received from individuals and clubs who have experienced attitude problems with some testing stations we are considering compiling a list of MoT stations (to be on our website) who welcome historic vehicles and have the specialist knowledge to be able to deal with their particular MoT requirements. We envisage splitting the list into various specialities such as cars, motorcycles, commercials etc. We would welcome and encourage our members’ input here – please contact the secretary giving full contact details and the proposed specialist category of the garage.

 

DVLA

The DVLA have offered to host a question and answer session for our member clubs. Questions will have to be submitted in advance in order to ensure that the correct DVLA people are in attendance. Clubs who would like to take part should contact the secretary with their queries. So that everyone can get the most out of this event it would be helpful if the questions were on general matters of procedure and not about specific cases. For help with specific individual queries please do contact our DVLA liaison officer, Nigel Harrison.

 

The event is expected to take place in the New Year, probably in the Bristol area and it will be mid-week. Until we know how many clubs would like to participate we cannot book a venue, so please do contact the secretary with your queries as early as is practically possible. The event will be strictly by advance, but free, ticket only and we may have to limit clubs to just two representatives each.

 

 

EU LEGISLATION

(Extract from FIVA’s regular update provided by its lobbying service, EPPA)

 

Second meeting of the European Parliament Historic Vehicle Group

The second meeting of the European Parliament’s Historic Vehicle Group took place on 19 October in Strasbourg. During the meeting Horst Brüning, FIVA’s president and FBHVC’s Andrew Burt gave a presentation about the definition of a historic vehicle. They explained that a wide range of definitions are currently used in both EU and national laws and that ideally one common definition would be recognised by decision makers and in law. They then detailed the FIVA definition, explained its rationale and the importance of a definition allowing regulatory audiences to understand why historic vehicles should be treated differently to all other vehicles, especially to all other ‘older’ vehicles. Horst Brüning and Andrew Burt explained that the existing variety of definitions has not created any major practical problems to date, but that as legislation with exemptions for historic vehicles increases (which is likely because of the development of Intelligent Transport Systems and LEZs) there will be a heightened need for a common definition to avoid problems and make life simpler for owners, regulators and law enforcers in the future. They therefore urged the MEPs to help FIVA to promote and achieve a common definition for future use in EU legislation.  The MEPs expressed their surprise at the current situation and agreed that they would aim to help FIVA in its objective.

 

Roadworthiness Testing – Commission considered consultation responses

FIVA contributed to the European Commission’s consultation on a possible amendment to the 1996 Roadworthiness Testing Directive in September. The existing Directive allows Member States to treat historic vehicles differently to other vehicles in their national testing regimes. However, the definition of a historic vehicle in the existing Directive is not satisfactory as it is: ‘certain vehicles operated or used in exceptional conditions and vehicles which are never, or hardly ever, used on public highways, including vehicles of historic interest which were manufactured before 1 January 1960 or which are temporarily withdrawn from circulation’. In its submission FIVA has therefore said that this definition should be changed to reflect the FIVA definition. FIVA also explained that there is likely to be an increasing need for historic vehicles be to treated differently as testing will increasingly rely on highly sensitive automated machines. This lack of human intervention and reliance on equipment designed for modern vehicles may well lead to historic vehicles unfairly and unnecessarily failing tests. Hence the need for historic vehicles – appropriated defined - be allowed to be treated differently to modern vehicles. FIVA also made the point that historic vehicles include all vehicles – i.e. motorcycles and commercial vehicles as well as cars.

 

FIVA will meet with the European Commission before the end of the year to explain further its views. FIVA hopes that the Commission will recognise the need to maintain the special provisions for historic vehicles and recognise the need to change the definition so that it mirrors the FIVA definition. 

 

 

LONDON TO BRIGHTON VETERAN CAR RUN

Financial Impact Assessment

Roger Wrapson

 

Participants in this year’s London to Brighton Veteran Car Run on 7 November had bright sunshine and a cold easterly wind to contend with, in direct contrast to last year’s torrential rain. Spectators watching the finish in Madeira Drive on Brighton’s sea front were also invited to participate in a financial impact assessment survey run jointly by the Federation and the University of Brighton’s Business School.

 

The survey was carried out by students from the university and was designed to establish how far spectators travel to watch the event and how much they spend on the day, with the overall aim of assessing the financial value of the event to Brighton.

 

Over 600 spectators were interviewed throughout the day in several locations on the route into Brighton including a number of visitors from Europe. A separate survey will be carried out among the successful 433 competitors who reached Brighton and enjoyed a formal dinner that evening.

 

It is anticipated that the results will be available early in the New Year.

 

The Federation will be starting its own regular survey assessing the value of the old vehicle movement to the UK’s economy early in the new year when, this time, the questionnaire will be carried out electronically via the Federation’s web site. The last survey carried out in 2006 showed that the historic vehicle movement was worth £3 billion annually to UK PLC.       

 

 

DVLA

Nigel Harrison

 

Reconstructed classics - revised definition

If there is not the required pre-1983 evidence available to register the vehicle under its original number using the V765 scheme, (or if the original registration number is not known), the fallback position is to apply for an age-related number. The DVLA local office would allocate an age-related number based upon the definition contained in the recently revised information leaflet INF26, which is titled Guidelines on how you can register kit cars and rebuilt or radically altered vehicles. The most relevant revised section is headed Reconstructed Classics:

‘The reconstructed classic category is intended to support the registration of unregistered classic vehicles. Reconstructed vehicles must comprise of genuine period components all over 25 years old, and of the same specification. The appropriate vehicle enthusiasts club for the marque (make) must confirm in writing that following inspection, they authenticate that the vehicle is a true reflection of that marque and that it meets the above criteria. This written confirmation must support an application to the [DVLA] local office. An age related registration number will be based on the age of the youngest component used.

Reconstructed classics or replica classic vehicles built to original specification using a mixture of new and used components will be issued with a Q registration number. The vehicle must have IVA, SVA or MSVA.’

 

The major change is that the vehicle must be inspected by the ‘appropriate vehicle enthusiasts club for the marque’. If an age-related number is being applied for, the vehicle will need to comply with the definition above, and the club letter will need to contain the key phrases from the above definition.

 

I would also draw your attention to the likely outcome in registering a vehicle which is built to original specification, but using a mixture of new and used components. The full document is available to download at www.direct.gov.uk then search using INF26.

 

Failed claims for original registration numbers

During the Federation’s visit to DVLA in October, we visited the section that deals with V765 applications, and saw three examples of failed applications. It might be instructive to outline why those particular applications failed.

 

Case 1: a pre-war vehicle with special body. There were photographs of the vehicle and a letter from a specialist club. However, there was no V55/5 (the form to register the vehicle), no V765 (the form to claim the original number) and no evidence to link the registration number to the vehicle, (typically, a certified copy of the original old style logbook). The specialist club should have known better than to allow such a poorly prepared application to be sent.

 

Case 2: a pre-war vehicle.  There were photographs of the vehicle, ‘evidence’ from the internet, and a long letter from the owner. There was no V55/5, no V765, no pre-1983 evidence in ‘certified copy’ form, and no covering letter from a sponsoring club. This was a ‘full house’ in terms of how not to mount a claim for a particular number. It certainly looked as though the owner had not approached the appropriate specialist club for their advice.

 

Case 3: a post-war vehicle. There was a photograph of the vehicle, completed V55/5 and V765 forms, and a certified photocopy of a tax disc. Unfortunately the photocopy of the tax disc was only certified by the club. Certified copies of documentation in the owner’s possession (e.g. old style logbook, tax disc, insurance certificate, plating plate, etc) need to be certified by a DVLA local office, as defined in the V765/3 guidance notes, which every V765 scheme member club has been issued with. Copies of archive documents, e.g. registration registers, would need to be certified by the document owner, which typically would be a local authority. This application almost passed. I would expect that a reapplication with the tax disc certified by a DVLA local office would be successful.

 

DVLA are more than happy for the claimed registration number to be reunited with the vehicle, provided the fairly straightforward criteria are met, and there are no other reasons why this registration number can’t be used on that vehicle perhaps because the number has been transferred to another vehicle, or is on retention.

 

If an owner or a club feels that an application has been unfairly rejected, the Federation can look at the evidence, and possibly make suggestions about what additional information is required. However, if the documentary evidence does not exist, there is no point in resubmitting an application to DVLA.

 

Resubmitted Applications

DVLA make archive copies of all the documents supplied with both successful and failed applications, and the original supplied documents are returned to the owner. This means that when a failed application is resubmitted, the new application is compared with the previous one. When a resubmission is prepared, the reasons why the previous application was rejected needs to be addressed. In 2009 there were around 2800 V765 applications and around 400 of these were rejected. This is all wasted time and effort, both by the owner, the sponsoring club (if there was one) and by DVLA.

 

It is perfectly understandable than an owner who has never been involved with a V765 application could be unfamiliar with the actual procedure. However, I would expect that the club signatory should be familiar with these procedures and should be carrying out a vetting service on the quality of the information that is supplied. Club signatories are there to guide the applicants. If the documentary information does not fit the DVLA requirements, (as defined on the V765 form) it is a waste of everybody’s time to submit that application.

 

Example. On the initial application a club had forwarded documents to DVLA indicating that a vehicle had a replica chassis. When the owner was notified that this would lead to a Q plate being allocated, the owner requested that the application be withdrawn. A few months later, a slightly revised application was submitted, where the replica chassis was not mentioned, and the club letter was ambiguous. As is standard practice by DVLA, the previous application was looked at, and compared with, the new application. The club was requested to clarify the inconsistencies between the two applications. In this case, the reputation of the club was on the line.

 

Information distribution

The information in the Federation’s Newsletter is designed to keep you informed about what the Federation is doing to ‘uphold the freedom’ to continue to use our historic vehicles. The intention is that the information is there to be passed on to individual club members, based on the editorial judgment of a club’s magazine editor. Some clubs have a regular section using such extracts but other clubs make no mention of our work.

 

A good example of why this can be important came up recently. A club member wanted to have the engine number and capacity corrected on a V5C and assumed that just sending off the amended V5C would be sufficient. The additional complication was that he was in the process of selling his vehicle, and quite reasonably, the sale could not take place until the V5C was corrected. The owner was not aware that DVLA requires independent verification of engine capacity changes, which for an historic vehicle, could be a suitably worded letter from the appropriate specialist club. This subject was covered in Federation Newsletter No. 2, 2010, but the owner was not aware of this information, possibly because it had not been reproduced in his club’s magazine. The consequence of this delayed the receipt of a corrected V5C, and the possible loss of a sale. Note that changes in cylinder capacity, together with the independent verification should be made at your DVLA local office. With an historic vehicle a change in engine capacity does not affect the nil duty being paid but unfortunately the Federation has not been able to convince DVLA that historic vehicles should be exempted from the requirement for independent verification of capacity changes.

 

New V5C and scrapping update

When taking your vehicle to an Authorised Treatment Facility (ATF) i.e. dismantler, the key phrase in the process is ‘intention to discard’. This means that the dismantler can chose to scrap the vehicle, or treat it as a used vehicle and sell it. On the V5C you need to fill in the V5C/3 section, (the yellow part), get the dismantler to sign it, and then you, as the former owner, post it to DVLA. If the dismantler scraps the vehicle, they generate a Certificate of Destruction (CoD), and pass it on to you as the former owner. If a CoD has been obtained this ends the keeper’s responsibility for the vehicle.

 

If you have scrapped the vehicle yourself, with an old style V5C, just tick the scrapping box. This will no longer be shown on DVLA records as a scrapped notification but the record will be amended to show that you no longer have the vehicle.

 

If you have a new red V5C, which does not have the scrapping box, as explained in the last Newsletter, it is a slightly different procedure. In the original DVLA press release, the option of self-scrapping is not mentioned, and it could be implied that if you self-scrap, and don’t take it to an Authorised Treatment Facility, then forever and a day you will be SORNing the vehicle. The DVLA press release says:

‘The ‘scrap’ box has also been removed because all cars, light vans and three-wheeled motor vehicles- excluding motor tricycles, must be taken to an Authorised Treatment Facility, who should issue a Certificate of Destruction (CoD). Vehicles other than those already mentioned, should still be taken to an ATF to ensure they are destroyed to environmental standards. Anyone keeping the vehicle but breaking it up for parts, etc, should make a Statutory off Road Notification (SORN) to let DVLA know that the vehicle is being kept unlicensed and off the road.’

 

However, on the leaflet called Your Registration Certificate (V5C) and you (INS160, 7/10) which is sent out with the new red front V5C, is the following:

‘If you have broken up the vehicle yourself, you must either tax it or tell us you are keeping it off the public road by making a SORN, until you take it to an ATF or tell us you no longer have it.’

 

I would draw you attention to those last eight words, ‘or tell us you no longer have it’, which for whatever reasons were not on the DVLA press release. The logical approach is that if you still have the key remnants of the vehicle, e.g. the chassis or bodyshell, you will still need to keep declaring SORN. However, when you dispose of those key remnants, you fill in the V5C/3 section that is called Selling or transferring your vehicle to a motor trader, insurer or dismantler. If the dismantler or, for example, foreman in charge of the Local Authority metal recycling skip is reluctant to sign his section of the V5C/3, then send the entire V5C, together with a dated and signed covering letter, to DVLA. I would suggest that you make a copy of what you send to DVLA. Within four weeks DVLA should confirm receipt of your letter, and confirm that you are not the registered keeper, and the tax/SORN notices should stop arriving every year.

 

Continuous Insurance Enforcement (CIE)

The Federation supports the introduction of Continuous Insurance Enforcement, and elsewhere in the Newsletter is information from DVLA on this subject however there are a couple of points that are not mentioned in the DVLA press release.

 

Where a non-match is made, i.e. the taxed vehicle on the DVLA database does not appear to have its insured counterpart on the Motor Insurance Database (MID) then further checks are made against the other unmatched vehicles on the MID. Discrepancies caused by letters being mistaken for numbers e.g. O and 0, and I and 1 should not generate the Insurance Advisory Letter. Similarly, recently registered vehicles which produce a non-match will be subject to further checks. Some DVLA legacy vehicle data derived from early old style logbooks is particularly sketchy, but hopefully any further checks, if required, will produce a match.

 

CIE does not apply to SORNed vehicles, so a SORNed vehicle may, or may not, be insured, based on the judgement of the owner.

 

Below are examples of why a mis-match might occur.

 

Example 1: a vehicle has been issued with an age-related number and for whatever reason the vehicle is not insured under that registration number. This is possibly because either the vehicle is still insured under its chassis number, or under a number that has been transferred off the vehicle and is on retention. When a new registration number is allocated to a vehicle by DVLA, it is the keeper’s responsibility to notify the insurance company of this new information. In this case, contact the insurance company to get the MID corrected.

 

Example 2: if your vehicle is insured under some form of company or trade group policy where the insurer does not record registration numbers, then it could be anticipated that you will receive a Insurance Advisory Letter. Contact the insurance company to get the MID amended.

 

Example 3: overdue renewal. The normal insurance renewal notice should arrive in plenty of time to allow for comparison of insurance quotations. In practical terms, if the receipt of your insurance renewal is received by the insurance company beyond the renewal date, it is possible that you will be sent the initial Insurance Advisory letter. Once again, contact the insurance company.

 

 

CONTINUOUS INSURANCE ENFORCEMENT

Stay insured: new penalties for vehicles without motor insurance

Ian Davies, Communications & Stakeholder Management, Continuous Insurance Enforcement Project 2, Change Delivery Portfolio, DVLA.

 

A new law is being introduced next year that will require taxed vehicles to be insured at all times, not just when in use on the road.

 

Background

In July 2004 the Government published a report called ‘Uninsured Driving in the United Kingdom’ that highlighted that the level of uninsured driving was amongst the highest in western Europe. One of the recommendations of the report was to introduce a record-based means of identifying uninsured vehicles. Following a public consultation in 2009 the Government decided to introduce a means of identifying uninsured vehicles by comparing records held on the Motor Insurance Database (MID) with those held by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA).

 

From early 2011 a new law will give the DVLA and the Motor Insurers' Bureau (MIB), who administer the Motor Insurance Database, more powers to deal with registered keepers of vehicles that are taxed but not insured, through the introduction of Continuous Insurance Enforcement (CIE).

 

Continuous Insurance Enforcement

Uninsured vehicles will be identified by comparing the Motor Insurance Database with DVLA’s Vehicle Database. Where a vehicle is taxed, but apparently uninsured, the MIB will issue an ‘Insurance Advisory Letter’ to the registered keeper advising them of the actions they need to take:

·      If not insured, insure immediately;

·      If they believe they are insured, contact their insurance provider immediately to check that the Motor Insurance Database has been updated with the correct information;

·      Make a Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) to DVLA so that the vehicle is not included in CIE;

·      If they no longer have the vehicle, notify DVLA in writing.

 

If the keeper fails to undertake one of the above actions and the vehicle remains taxed but not insured, then DVLA will issue the registered keeper with a £100 Fixed Penalty Notice (reduced to £50 if paid within 21 days). Failure to pay the penalty and insure the vehicle could result in court prosecution with a fine of up to £1,000, and the vehicle being wheel-clamped or impounded if found on the public road.

 

CIE does not replace the laws of driving whilst uninsured; that will continue to be enforced by the police.

This new motor insurance law only applies to England, Scotland and Wales (vehicles registered in Northern Ireland, Channel Islands and Isle of Man are excluded from this law as they have their own registration authorities).

 

For more information on CIE, please visit www.direct.gov.uk/stayinsured

 

When is CIE being introduced?

The exact date cannot yet be given, but will be in early 2011. Announcements will be made in the press before CIE becomes law.

 

Historic Vehicle Owners

For historic vehicle owners there are a number of important things to remember.

·      SORN – if a SORN is made and the tax disc surrendered because the vehicle is not in use, then the vehicle will not be subject to CIE;

·      Pre-SORN vehicles - vehicles which have been kept off-road before SORN came into force on 1 February 1998 are exempt from CIE unless they are brought back into use, in which case they would need to be insured or a SORN made;

·      Vehicles manufactured before 1 January 1973 though the vehicle may have a ‘nil value’ tax disc, it is classed as being ‘taxed’ and a SORN should be made if uninsured and not in use;

·      Ask MID - if you want to check your vehicle is recorded as ‘insured’ on the Motor Insurance Database, visit the free service at www.askMID.com.

 

The author has kindly allowed us to print his email address if anyone has any enquiries: ian.davies2@dvla.gsi.gov.uk

 

 

FUEL NEWS FROM FBHVC

Consultation on draft regulations which amend the Motor Fuel (Composition and Content) Regulations 1999 to implement European Directive 2009/30/EC with respect to Fuel Quality

The FBHVC responded to this lengthily titled consultation at the beginning of June thus:

 

The FBHVC recognises that major policy directives on fuel quality cannot reasonably be resisted by a minority group whose principle fuel demand is linked to specialty interest activities. Nevertheless there are some points which the Federation wishes to establish as part of the consultation process:

 

i)     Petrol containing ethanol is potentially harmful to the fuel systems of the majority of vehicles operated by FBHVC members. The dangers of corrosion and degradation of materials used in the fuel systems of historic vehicles have been highlighted by the CONCAWE organisation. There are no benefits to FBHVC members from the inclusion of ethanol in petrol, and in general, the higher the ethanol content the greater the concerns.

 

ii)  Contrary to the assertion contained in the DfT consultation document that cars with carburettors can be expected to disappear quietly over the next few years, so that by 2013 there will no longer be a problem, the number of historic vehicles covered by the Federation is not expected to reduce over time. The Federation wishes to put on record that it does not accept that problems caused by the enforced inclusion of ethanol in petrol in the UK are not, or will not, be an issue in the future in vehicles it represents.

 

Additives for use with biofuels

Few problems are anticipated with ‘ordinary’ road diesel as none have been reported from other countries where the transition to fuel containing bio-diesel has that they take precautions to avoid storing red diesel for prolonged periods without an additive both in storage tanks and in vehicle fuel tanks and keep all storage tanks scrupulously clean. It should be noted that the use of a biocide to overcome contamination would result in a waste product defined as a biohazard.already taken place. The problems likely to be encountered with red diesel have been written about in great detail in the newsletter already (issue 6, 2009) and this information is also available on our website www.fbhvc.co.uk. Any agricultural diesel users should make sure

 

Additives are available to protect against the main problems likely to be encountered for petrol and diesel fuelled vehicles (corrosion inhibitors, stability improvers and biocidal products).

 

A product for use with petrol has been designed to be added to the tank when re-fuelling to prevent degradation in storage in the fuel tank. It provides excellent protection against the possible corrosion through increased acidity which can occur when petrol containing ethanol is stored for any length of time. One bottle should provide a season’s protection – although this is obviously dependent on the vehicle and amount of usage.

 

A similar product for bio-diesel fuel (e.g. containing rapeseed methyl ester) has also been developed. There is no corrosion issue here but one of fuel filter blockage, injector fouling etc. It is also designed to be dispensed from a plastic bottle (with graduated optic) at refuelling time.

 

These products exist but do not have a commercial outlet as yet. Any organisation who might be interested in selling these types of product should contact the FBHVC secretary in the first instance. It may also be possible to include lead-replacement additives in the marketing package.

 

Study into material compatibility and carburettor icing

An investigation had been started by DfT, undertaken by Stephen Wall, Senior Scientist at the Fuels and Lubricants Centre, QinetiQ, based in Farnborough, to investigate the effects of petrol containing up to 10% ethanol. Specifically this will investigate vehicle fuel system material compatibility and carburettor icing as well as other aspects such as drivability issues.

 

The FBHVC has been invited to submit evidence of problems to this study and we would welcome information from member clubs.

 

April 2010

ANTIFREEZE – (UPDATED)

In the article in the last newsletter, we said ‘Bluecol and Blue Star are well known brand names and both of these are declared suitable for classic cars‘. Perhaps we should clarify that we were referring to the traditional blue coloured Bluecol - but the company also sell a red coloured Organic Acid Technology (OAT) product suitable only for modern cars, not classics. Even more confusingly, there is also      Bluecol U, which marketed as a universal top up, and not an antifreeze product with which you would fill the whole tank. The manufacturer has assured us that this is suitable for historic vehicles.

It has also been brought to our attention that Halford’s sell a blue-coloured ‘Advanced’ antifreeze which has a label containing the phrase: ‘Older vehicles can further benefit…’ but on further examination it was discovered that this product does indeed contain OAT and therefore cannot be recommended for historic engines.

Our postbag has also been swelled by correspondence relating to the extremely poisonous nature of ethylene glycol, indeed the Cats’ Protection League have gone so far as to start an on-line petition to highlight the danger to small animals accidentally ingesting tiny quantities of the product. Propylene glycol is much safer and one of our new trade supporters, AAA Solutions Ltd, is about to launch a propylene glycol based antifreeze specifically aimed at historic vehicles.

It does remain a rather confused picture, but the important facts to remember for historic vehicle owners are: use only Inorganic Additive Technology (IAT) products according to the manufacturers’ instructions and take great care with any liquid containing ethylene glycol.

 

 

DVLA-ENGINE CHANGES

In the last Newsletter we requested examples of where DVLA had asked supplementary questions before accepting engine change information on the V5C. Thank you for all of the examples that you have sent to the Federation.

Many vehicle excise duty categories directly relate to the size of the engine and these have recently been further refined to take account of a vehicle’s CO2 emission levels. It is therefore understandable why DVLA should want the engine size and type to be verified by an independent organisation as this could make a difference to the VED due. At present the Historic Vehicle class of is one of the few taxation classes, which is independent of engine size and type, so the potential reduction in excise duty does not apply, although we cannot rule this out for the future of course.

The general principle is that the size and type of the new engine should be verified by an organisation independent of the owner. The standard DVLA ‘engine change’ letter gives a choice of various options. Understandably, the options are orientated around modern vehicles. For an historic vehicle an independent organisation with sufficient knowledge could be the appropriate vehicle enthusiasts club, so a suitable worded letter from the club should be sufficient.

There will be some vehicles where the actual engine might not have been changed but for some reason the DVLA record is incorrect. Once again, a suitable ‘engine identification’ letter from the appropriate vehicle enthusiasts club could well be sufficient to correct this.

Regarding the existing DVLA requirement that all engine changes require verification by an organisation independent of the owner, the Federation is in correspondence with DVLA in respect of this requirement for historic vehicles. We have been assured by DVLA that there has been no recent change of policy here and for many of the case histories that we have been sent the confusion has arisen because the change requested was to the engine capacity as well as the engine number or an over-zealous clerk has sent the wrong letter when a purely clerical error needed to be corrected.

DVLA PROCEDURAL TRIAL

 

In Newsletter No. 1, 2008, I explained that for a trial period, with a claim for an original registration number (a V765 claim), the acceptance slip from the V765 form would not be returned to the club who processed the application. The trial is now complete, and the Federation has accepted that this, the non-return of the tear off slip, will now become the standard procedure. If an application is rejected, the club will still be notified.

 

REGISTRATION OF NEW VEHICLES

The European Commission is currently drafting a Regulation for Individual Vehicle Type Approval. FIVA noted the draft Regulation states that:

For the purposes of individual approval, a vehicle is deemed to be new when:                                                                                                        

a) it has never been registered previously or;                                            

b) it has been registered for less than six months at the time of the application for individual approval.

By registration, it is meant that the vehicle has obtained the administrative authorisation for entry into service in road traffic, involving its identification and the issuing of a registration number. The term registration includes permanent, temporary and short-term registration as well.

FIVA has noted that this type of definition of new vehicles based on registration documentation is increasingly being used at national level as well and is causing problems for historic vehicle owners as the registration documents of a small proportion of historic vehicles do not accurately reflect their age because: there was no original registration; documents have been lost; original documents were destroyed after import into the EU. In these cases, the vehicle may then be classified as ‘new’ and therefore fail to benefit from other legal provisions/conditions specific to historic vehicles.

FIVA has raised this concern with the European Commission, which in the first instance has appeared ready to find a solution. It invited FIVA to propose a footnote which may be used in the Regulation to clarify that the age of a historic vehicle with ‘new’ registration documentation (which does not reflect the vehicles true age) should be determined by the available documented evidence of date of manufacture of the vehicle, or documented evidence of first purchase, or of the year that typically corresponds to that vehicle. FIVA taken the matter forward and will maintain discussions with the Commission with a view to a positive outcome.

 

 

Continuous insurance

 

Just after the last newsletter went to press, there was a sudden flurry of enquiries following media reports about new measures to enforce motor insurance regulations. The reports were triggered by a press announcement issued by the Department for Transport to coincide with the publication of their analysis of the responses to the consultation on a ‘Scheme of Continuous Enforcement of Motor Insurance’ (see Newsletter 2/2009).

 

There has been a series of consultations on this topic, going back several years. The underlying proposal is to undertake regular comparison between the DVLA database of vehicles that are licensed for road use and the motor insurers’ database (MID) of vehicles that are insured. The comparison would identify vehicles that appear only on the former, and keepers of those vehicles would then become liable to penalty, whether or not the vehicle concerned was actually in use. Legislation to make this possible was contained in Section 22 of the Road Safety Act of 2006, allowing the Secretary of State to make appropriate regulations for the application of the new law and to decide when it should start. The latest consultation was concerned with the detail of those regulations.

 

Typically, some of the media reports caused needless anxiety for some whose vehicles were licensed, but temporarily out of use and uninsured, by suggesting this was some new idea and hinting that the new system was already in operation. A closer look at the press announcement would have shown the journalists responsible that DfT expects the new enforcement regime to come into force in the 'next financial year'.

 

At present, it is only illegal to use, or keep, an uninsured vehicle on the road - provided it is off the road, it doesn't matter whether it is insured or not. However, once the new regulations come into force, and Section 22 of the Road Safety Act of 2006 commences, it will be an offence to keep an uninsured vehicle unless it is SORNed (or has been off the road since before the SORN system began in January 1998).

 

FBHVC supports the principle of this scheme, as it believes it will reduce the number of uninsured vehicles on the roads. The obvious caveat is the risk that a properly insured vehicle may not show up on the MID for some reason, such as being one of many vehicles on a multi-vehicle policy. Owners can check that their vehicles appear on the insurance database by checking at www.askmid.com - and we recommend that everyone should make that basic check shortly after each insurance renewal.

 

 

Ethanol in Petrol

 

Discussion also took place about ethanol in petrol. Concerns expressed by Federation members have been raised, in respect of fuel system corrosion and also high fuel volatility, which has been causing operational difficulties. The oil industry position is based on a safety concern over reduction of volatility. The validity of the safety concern was questioned and is now being checked by DfT, but it seems unlikely that there will be a reduction in fuel volatility other than a small correction to reflect the blending of ethanol into the fuel.

 

It is confirmed that Shell V-Power petrol is currently guaranteed not to contain ethanol. It is not an exchange product, being unique to Shell, so is under their close control, unlike most other fuels sold at filling stations. Thus for the time being, members wishing to avoid petrol containing ethanol can buy this product, which also has the advantage of being widely available.

 

The issue of corrosion concerns with petrol containing ethanol is being pursued further, but at present there is nothing more to report.

 

Registration of historic vehicles

 

The DVLA leaflet INF 26, Guidelines for the Registration of Rebuilt or Radically Altered Vehicles and Kitcars, gives definitions for ‘Radically Altered Vehicles’ and ‘Reconstructed Classics’ and allocates a point score to the various major components of the vehicle. The chassis or monocoque bodyshell scores five points; suspension, both axles, transmission, and steering assembly all score two points each; the engine scores one point. If an already registered vehicle is radically altered then, provided it scores more than eight points, it may retain its original registration number. For a vehicle with a separate chassis, the body is not scored by the points system, so a new body should not affect the retention of the registration number.

 

However, for a vehicle where either there is no documentary evidence to claim the original number, or if the original number is unknown, then an age related number should be allocated assuming the criterion of ‘Reconstructed Classics’ is met. The definition is: ‘Vehicles comprising genuine period components of the same specifications, all over 25 years old, will be assigned an age-related registration mark. The appropriate vehicle enthusiasts club must confirm the authenticity of the components’. I had assumed until now, that the period components were the major mechanical components in the radically altered points system. However, it appears that this may not strictly be the case. The consequence of this is that the installation of a new body prior to registration could mean that the vehicle is allocated a ‘Q’ plate. The principle is for ‘genuine period components of the same specifications, all over 25 years old’ should be used. It therefore follows that the vehicle should be registered with its existing ‘over 25 years old’ body still in place provided, of course, that it can meet the MoT requirements. Only when the vehicle is registered, should a body replacement be contemplated.

This particular case came to light because the owner passed to DVLA a receipt for what could be interpreted as being a new body. There has been another case where the DVLA local office has required that form V627/1, entitled ‘Built Up Vehicle Inspection Report’ is completed. This form requests receipts for replacement parts. It is perfectly understandable that if DVLA are given information they will take it into account when assessing the vehicle. The moral of this story is that if it is an age-related application, careful consideration needs to be given to how a vehicle and its documents, including the covering dating letter/certificate, are presented to a DVLA local office.

 

 

 

Declaring SORN on a newly acquired vehicle

 

SORN (Statutory Off Road Notification) is only applicable to a vehicle whose licence disc expired on, or after, 31 January 1998. If you have just acquired a vehicle that is subject to SORN, a recent case has indicated that the on-line SORN system should not be used to declare the initial

SORN under your new ownership. This is because of the way in which the SORN legislation, and on-line SORN system works. If a vehicle is being taxed, then it is perfectly normal for the new owner to take over the unexpired period of tax. However, the SORN period starts at the beginning of a month, and then stops when there is a change in ownership. The online SORN system can only start a period of SORN at the start of the month, and then stops that SORN when the ownership changes.

 

SORN cannot be made online within the month of registering as keeper.

 

If you have acquired a vehicle, and you are going to declare SORN, as well as filling in the V5C to register the change of ownership, (or V62 if V5/V5C was missing) it is essential that you fill in a V890, (SORN form) as well. The V890 SORN form is available for download on line from www.direct.gov.uk, or should be available from a main Post Office. Staple these forms together, and send to DVLA Swansea, SA99 1AR. I would suggest that it is always wise to make copies of these forms before sending them off.

 

You should receive written confirmation of the SORN declaration within four weeks. If no acknowledgement letter is received then the DVLA instructions are that you must contact Customer Enquiries Group on 0870 240 0010 immediately.

 

In summary, new keepers should make a SORN declaration via the paper based SORN V890 application form.

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/OwningAVehicle/UntaxedVehicle/DG_4022058

 

FBHVC CORRECTION
 
Last month’s magazine contained information on the use of Ethanol in fuel. 
The article inferred that Shell V-Power fuel was guaranteed not to contain ethanol. 
This has since been discovered to be incorrect. 
Shell’s statement states that, ‘Shell, like many other fuel suppliers, 
has begun blending ethanol into some Unleaded grades, including Shell V-Power at Stanlow, 
to comply with the legal obligations of the RFTO’.